Category Archives: horror

Guest Post: Andy Peloquin

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Why Do We Love Horror So?

 

Horror as a genre is quite a fascinating one!

What is it about the “things that go bump” that sends a chill down our spine? Why do our hearts race when we read tales of werewolves, vampires, zombies, or demons? What makes us shiver and quake when we read stories about mind-stealing aliens, hordes of nightmarish creatures, and monsters from mythology and lore?

Fear is a pretty interesting emotion. There are two types of fear:

  • Fear of something — Disease, death, theft, suffering, pain, dishonor, loss of money or status, etc.
  • Fear for something — Fear for your family and loved ones.

Which one causes more terror? Neither trumps the other–both are equally terrifying!

When we experience these fears, our body does some interesting things:

  • Our heart speeds up (by as much as 15 BPM faster than our resting heart rate)
  • Our skin temperature drops
  • Our palms begin to sweat
  • Our muscles get all tense and knotted up
  • Our blood pressure rises

What is causing all of these reactions? Why do our bodies act like this?

Simply put: it’s all about evolution.

Animals and humans have evolved over the years (centuries, millennia, etc.), adapting to their environment. Our brain and bodies have evolved slowly, and there are still certain aspects of our physiology and psychology that have not yet evolved. Look at the appendix and the last thoracic vertebra (the tail bone)–neither of these are strictly necessary, but we still have them.

Our psyche has changed a lot over time, but there are still things that remain unchanged. When we see something that is a threat (even if it’s just on a TV screen or in our minds), our bodies react out of instinct. The “animal” within us has that visceral gut reaction of fear and anxiety, and there is no control over it.

Psychologists aren’t quite sure what makes horror and action movies so appealing to us. Some believe that it has to do with the concept of “rites of passage”. Young males had to undergo certain physical and psychological tests and stressors to be considered “men”. Though many of those rites have disappeared from modern society, they’re not entirely gone.

Look at the “hazing” many college students endure. It’s all about “surviving” the torments–physical and mental. Horror movies and books have that same effect on us. They push our bodies to the limits of fear, and they give us a way to prove our courage. The “scarier” the movie or book, the “tougher” we are to survive it unscathed and unaffected by it.

Here’s an interesting thought: all of the physical effects of horror listed above (the increase in blood pressure, the racing heart, the sweaty palms, etc.) are the same effects caused by arousal and sex drive. Perhaps we “enjoy” horror so much not because of the actual horror itself, but because of the reaction it produces in our bodies. The flood of adrenaline, the surge of excitement, and the emotional “rush” caused by horror is a variety of the pleasure we feel when attracted to someone else.

Whatever the reason, horror is a genre that is here to stay! After all, what would we do without a good book or movie that gets our heart racing, sends chills down our spines, and gives us an excuse to cling to that handsome man or pretty woman beside us?

 

A faceless, nameless assassin. A forgotten past.  The Hunter of Voramis–a killer devoid of morals, or something else altogether? (Blade of the Destroyer–dark fantasy with a look at the underside of human nature)

 

The Last Bucelarii (Book 1): Blade of the Destroyer

The Hunter of Voramis is the perfect assassin: ruthless, unrelenting, immortal. Yet he is haunted by lost memories, bonded to a cursed dagger that feeds him power yet denies him peace of mind. Within him rages an unquenchable need for blood and death.

When he accepts a contract to avenge the stolen innocence of a girl, the Hunter becomes the prey. The death of a seemingly random target sends him hurtling toward destruction, yet could his path also lead to the truth of his buried past?

 

Title: The Last Bucelarii (Book 1): Blade of the Destroyer

Author: Andy Peloquin

Official Launch Date: August 21st, 2015

Publication Date: July 11th, 2015

Paperback Price: $15.99

Digital Price: $3.99

Pages: 298

ISBN: 1515038955

 

Amazon Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Blade-Destroyer-Last-Bucelarii-Book-ebook/dp/B012EI9M4A/

Amazon Paperback: http://www.amazon.com/Blade-Destroyer-Last-Bucelarii-Book/dp/1515038955/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25269614-blade-of-the-destroyer

Book Launch Event:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1625045874438351/

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Andy Peloquin: Lover of All Things Dark and Mysterious

Andy Peloquin–a third culture kid to the core–has loved to read since before he could remember. Sherlock Holmes, the Phantom of the Opera, and Father Brown are just a few of the books that ensnared his imagination as a child.

When he discovered science fiction and fantasy through the pages of writers like Edgar Rice Burroughs, J.R.R Tolkien, and Orson Scott Card, he was immediately hooked and hasn’t looked back since.

Andy’s first attempt at writing produced In the Days: A Tale of the Forgotten Continent. He has learned from the mistakes he made and used the experience to produce Blade of the Destroyer, a book of which he is very proud.

Reading—and now writing—is his favorite escape, and it provides him an outlet for his innate creativity. He is an artist; words are his palette.

His website (http://www.andypeloquin.com) is a second home for him, a place where he can post his thoughts and feelings–along with reviews of books he finds laying around the internet.

He can also be found on his social media pages, such as:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AndyPeloquin

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/andyqpeloquin

www.linkedin.com/in/andypeloquin/

https://plus.google.com/100885994638914122147/about

https://www.amazon.com/author/andypeloquin

https://www.facebook.com/andrew.peloquin.1

10 Things You Need to Know About Me:

  1. Hot wings, ALWAYS!
  2. I never forget a face, but rarely remember a name.
  3. I’m a head taller than the average person (I’m 6′ 6″)
  4. Marvel > DC
  5. I was born in Japan, and lived there until the age of 14.
  6. Selena Gomez and Five Finger Death Punch are both in my playlist.
  7. Aliens are real, but it’s self-centered of us to believe that they would come to visit Earth.
  8. Watching sports: suck. Playing sports: EPIC!
  9. I earned a purple belt in Karate/Hapkido/Taekwondo.
  10. I dislike most Christmas music, aside from Trans-Siberian Orchestra.

Reviews:

“Creative, gritty, and beautifully dark…fantasy addicts will love it!” — Peter Story, author of Things Grak Hates — http://peterjstory.com/

“The fantasy world has a compelling new antihero…the Hunter will terrify and captivate you.” – Eve A Floriste, author of Fresh Cut

“From the first words on the page this fantasy holds the reader spellbound even after the book is finished…his character is very well-defined even if his past is a mystery. Root for an assassin? Oh, yes, one must!” — Carol Conley, for InDTale Magazine

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Reblog: Brian Keene News

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He might’ve mentioned the interview we did for Arm Cast: Dead Sexy Horror Podcast at Scares That Care Weekend… and a few other important things going on with him… 

http://www.briankeene.com/2015/08/17/on-diversity-the-approaching-maelstrom-delayed-books-and-more/

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Zombie Escape Amsterdam

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Have you ever heard of an escape room? Being voluntarily locked up in a room with a bunch of friends. You have an hour the time to try to get out. And if you don’t? You fail the game and they just let you out.

Sounds a little anticlimactic doesn’t it? We also had that idea, so we came with something new: Zombie Escape Amsterdam

In our escape room the atmosphere and fear for the zombies is real. Were you are normally pretty comfortable in an escape room, here you really want to get out. With zombies closing in on you, you have to keep focused on all the puzzles en riddles in our laboratory. What kind of genetic modification experiments did these professors preform? Challenge your will power and courage in this escape room full of miserie and mystery.

Opening begin September in Amsterdam.

Www.zombie-escape.nl

+31207527722

info@zombie-escape.nl

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Guest Post: Michael Peirce

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    I’ve been writing intermittently all my life jumping from magazine stuff to commentary. I first trained on screen plays long ago.  Never thought I’d be writing about the Zombie Apocalypse.

 

I’d hit a patch of rough road, when a friend came to me and said he’d dreamed I wrote a musical about the Z-poc.  At first I thought he was just trying to give me something to do to get me back on track – but he handed me a song he’d written – that he’d remembered from the dream.  So – I wrote the musical and included his song.  I quickly put together another fifteen songs to work into the phases of the musical with a script and some ‘glue’ music and six months later I had something.

 

It was to be, or should I say, is to be (God willing) a multi-media production with a sixteen piece orchestra plus a band playing what I call ‘Southern Symphonic Metal.’   Short version – I couldn’t scrounge the resources to pull it off.  What to do eh?

 

So I have derived a novel from it.  I call it “Red Dirt Zombies: The Fight for the River Line.”  I thought I was writing a simple zombie-apoc story where the twist was one state, Georgia, fighting and winning. Nothing to it I thought, since I had the script as a starting point; a sort of rough draft.   A musical is much harder, right?

 

Then I started to really engage with my characters and the challenges they would face. No matter what else, I was determined I would not add to the glut of literature concerned with lone survivors scrambling for a can of beans while using exotic weapons they just happened to find, to fight bandits and zombies.

 

With the premise that Georgia would fight and win I had to figure out what gave the state an edge and how my characters would exploit that edge. I started considering the social implications, mental health crisis, and interaction with central government, at least until central government no longer existed.

 

Particularly harsh, for me, was the realization that while I’m very much a 2A type, that somehow I would have to reconcile Martial Law with the very real need for all to be armed and the fact that everyone would be suffering from extreme PTSD.  Because of the mass insanity, despair and paranoia, suicides and shooting accidents could actually threaten human viability. How would this be handled post war?

 

One of the solutions is a place called the Q-Zone.  It’s based partly on the Austrian Grenzers of Hapsburg times – part time farmers who patrolled the frontiers.  In Georgia – the frontiers are called The Final Line – the trace where our forces halted their attacks and declared victory.  We’re not sure what is out there really, and comms are shot since the US government went down in a nuclear frenzy early in the war.

 

The Q-Zone is a place for mind blown soldiers to “Come Down Slowly,” which I took from the musical, which has a video add with a smarmy recruiter noting that chill pills and ammo are free in the Q-Zone and no mental health exam required.   It’s a place where two young kids who have been lovers try to figure out what that means since they’ve forgotten how to be ‘normal people.’   I base it on a song called   “Life in the Q-Zone: PTSD for Lovers.”

 

Not clear yet if the Q-Zone will fit in this first volume which centers around the fight my central characters are involved in – for the North River Bridges defending Roswell as the Zs flood down from ‘Pill Hill’ where the hospitals are.  It’s where we take a stand and it’s do or die on the river line.  There the Armed Citizens, National Guard and State Defense Force people have the fight of their lives.  And the first two battalions of the upgraded SDF earn their ‘Whispering Death’ patches.

 

Somewhat to my surprise I have found that all the work I’ve done will not fit in one volume so I’m probably looking at a trilogy.  I’m working on a much different nonfiction piece I’d like to get out the door as well, plus I have to push all my new plotting back into the musical, but I learned as a contractor it’s always better to have too much work than too little.

 

I’ve submitted a short story / novella version of this first volume to ATZ and would be very pleased to be published there.  It’s called “Alice’s Posse” and introduces most of the key characters and the story line.

 

This will be no surprise to other writers but my characters took control of this work and ran with it.  Sometimes I couldn’t believe what was coming up – I’ve grown to love them in a way and it certainly took me off on some strange paths.

 

One strange path was my zombies.  My characters assume not surprisingly, that it is some sort of bio-warfare bug. Perhaps it is, perhaps not; but they cannot isolate it or identify it.  All I know is that when these corpses rise they are the nastiest daggone critters you can image.  They are fueled by hate for the living and a simple head shot may not do the job – you shoot these things to pieces.  They are so full of hate and rage they don’t even mass up tightly because they can’t stand each other.  This is about evil.

 

Research was fascinating – I walked all the North River Line along the Chattahoochee – Roswell is truly a beautiful place.  Went to the (fictional) Battle Headquarters at the Roswell Courthouse, the Cultural Center and visited the Governor’s Mansion.  Talked to all sorts of folks and found that among police and soldiers you will find many zombie fans!

 

Atlanta has this massive store of people who almost seem to hope you’ll ask them for assistance.  A very genteel Southern lady at the Mansion nodded politely but sternly reminded me not to let my zombies get on the antique furniture!

 

I need a book cover.  I know what it looks like – I can see it in my head.  I need a “Whispering Death” shoulder patch – crossed rifles with a skull pointing left with a bony finger extended in the universal ‘shhhhhhhh.’   I need a web site and I have to decide on some publishing options – all that seems very daunting some times.  But as our spec ops types like to say, “The only easy day was yesterday.”

 

Most all, I have to finish this ‘final’ edit.  So far I’m on track for the end of August.  I hope everyone likes it.  It’s been a trip.

*   *   *

Michael Peirce (Talbot)

    As a writer I originally apprenticed under a screen writer through five screen plays.  When in Hollywood eh?   I wrote much of the dialogue for those and for the sports script, a song called ‘Here’s Johnny Thunder.” Years later I turned on a baseball game and saw Chipper Jones for the first time and exclaimed, “It’s him!  Johnny Thunder!”

 

My personal study guides at the time were “Rolling Thunder” and “Alien,” both of which became well known movies.  I read the screen plays, I read the novels, saw the films – it was a blast.  A great learning experience but it didn’t take me very far.

 

Ultimately I’ve published in several formats including “Soldier of Fortune,” “Rockwell-Rothbard Report,” and “Destiny Magazine” off the top of my head.  I was also a columnist at LewRockell.com, the libertarian website, for four years.

 

Being published and paid for it is a trip.  I remember living in a cheap motel in Bell, California, where my landlady and her friends were all rooting for me!  My first check was photo-copied on their wall!

 

Additionally, I have been a restaurant manager, a musician/songwriter, a soldier in an African war, a private security agent / bodyguard, a bouncer, a programmer and project manager.  I’m self-educated since I’m easily bored and college seemed silly to me as a young know it all.  I’ve studied military history all my life.

 

I’m currently working on my Z-poc books and another called “Observations” about the sort of bizarre situations and people I encountered in Hollywood and Africa.

 

This link will take you to some of my music.  The two songs that are part of the Z-poc Musical are called “I See My Death in Your Faces” and “Life in the Q-Zone: PTSD for Lovers.”  I play the instruments and my friend Courtney Hamlet does the vocals.  http://www.bandmix.com/miketalbot/

 

Guest Post: Kris Ashton

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The difference between real and fictional horror

 

Those who don’t like horror movies often ask, “What’s the appeal? Why do you get off on such horrible things?”​​

As an aficionado of horror, both good and bad, for more than 30 years, I’ve long believed this question revealed more about the person asking it than anything else. Fictitious horror and real-life horror are completely different things.

Whether it’s someone tortured to death by a serial killer or a regular person watching a loved one die from a terminal disease, the end result is the same: emptiness. The serial killer’s thrill fades and there is only a body to dispose of; the regular person is left with nothing but grief and perhaps a guilty sense of relief that they no longer have to watch their loved one suffer and waste away.

Fictitious horror, especially the movie kind, provides the opposite. As many before me have noted, it is the equivalent of riding a roller coaster at a fun park – it offers the illusion that something terrible is happening, but in the end it stops and when reality asserts itself again it looks better than it did going in. A good horror movie offers a form of catharsis and helps us appreciate our everyday existence.

I’ve always got a rush out of horror movies. Even as a child, when I could barely stand to watch the most frightening scenes, there was a partition in my mind separating reality and fantasy. Some people don’t seem to have that partition, and they are the ones who tend to ask that question in the first paragraph.

Now, does the foregoing sound a touch complacent, even condescending? I wouldn’t have thought so – until I started watching season five of The Walking Dead.

In its third season, this magnificent TV show about the zombie apocalypse introduced a newborn baby called Judith. There was some drama as she came into the world, but then the associated problems one might have while caring for an infant in a dystopia full of mindless cannibals faded into the background. I was so disappointed with this* that I had a go at addressing it in a story of my own, ‘Teething Problems’, which will appear in Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine later this year.

The debut episode of season five, however, more than made up for any previous deficiencies.

A quick but necessary aside: in Danse Macabre, Stephen King talks about “psychic pressure points”. The horror writer (or filmmaker’s) job, he says, is to get through the reader’s mental defences and poke these pressure points, thereby evoking terror or horror. My defences, however, had always been nigh on impregnable, so while my heart rate might increase at a particularly terrifying or gory scene, horror never discomfited me.

Little did I know that becoming a father (and nearly two years bonding with my daughter) had put an enormous chink in my mental armour.

In that episode of The Walking Dead, baby Judith is put in serious peril. My heart rate rose, the adrenaline flowed… but I wasn’t enjoying myself. For the first time in my life, I wanted to stop watching, because the empathy was just too strong. What if that was my baby? How could he threaten such an innocent creature?

For those brief couple of minutes, I could sympathise with those on whom I had looked with such disdain for so long.

But I got through that scene and – spoiler alert** – so did Judith. When the episode finished and I returned to the real world, what I felt was elation and a more intense love for my daughter than ever before. So I wasn’t totally wrong. Fictional horror had, once again, done its job. It had given me a new appreciation for what I had.

True-life horror doesn’t do that. It doesn’t restore us; it leaves us bent and scarred, even if there is ultimately a happy ending. Which is yet another reason why those who try to blame horror movies (etcetera) for society’s ills are some of the greatest fools on earth. Not only are they wrong, they don’t know why they are wrong and are too ignorant to ever find out.

* I was a little disappointed, for much the same reason, with the otherwise brilliant 2004 Dawn of the Dead remake.

** I was very slow to abandon DVDs and join the digital download revolution. But when a MASSIVE spoiler from season five appeared on my Facebook feed, I decided – at least where The Walking Dead was concerned – the time had come to embrace change.

Kris Ashton

Kris Ashton is an Australian author best known for his works of dark speculative fiction. His new horror novel, Invasion at Bald Eagle, is available now at www.grandmalpress.com/Invasion.php

Website: http://kris-ashton.wix.com/spec-fic

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kris-Ashton-Author/494049427360631

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KrisAshtonWrite

 

Dark Moon Digest Announcement

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After five years of life, Stan Swanson of Dark Moon Books and Dark Moon Digest has sold the majority of his share of the digest to Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing. It is unclear yet what the future will hold for Dark Moon Books, but Perpetual Motion Machine will now be the sole publisher of Dark Moon Digest, the horror quarterly that first launched in October 2010.

 

Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing is owned by Max Booth III and Lori Michelle, who up until now has been the managing editor of Dark Moon Digest. Effective starting with Issue #21 (October 2015), Booth and Michelle will serve as the digest’s new publishers.

 

With new ownership comes some welcomed changes. For one, writers will now be paid $0.01/per word for each accepted piece of fiction. Dark Moon Digest will also be returning column sections and book reviews, which long time readers of the digest will recognize from early issues. However, authors can still expect the same care and dedication to their stories and readers can still expect the same great fiction they have come to expect from the quarterly. We will be searching for ad space in the near future along with more short stories for upcoming issues. Subscribe to our newsletter at www.pmmpnews.com to stay updated.

 

Perpetual Motion Machine is known for publishing dark crime pieces and disturbing slices of horror. Lori Michelle will be stepping up from Managing Editor of Dark Moon Digest to Editor-in-Chief, and Max Booth III’s unique touch will help continue to give life to a digest that has been so rich in nightmare fuel.

#WinterofZombie is Coming…

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This is more or less a teaser for ya…

Once again, November will be Winter of Zombie blog tour time and this year I am opening it up to not only the great zombie authors I’ve worked with in the past, but the new ones as well!

Starting September 1st (or around there) I will begin accepting zombie authors onto the list who are interested in participating in the event. A few things you need to know before you send me a message in September, though:

1. You have to have RELEASED a Zombie book. Seems common sense, but…

2. Your Zombie release has to be out before October 15th so I can get all the material for it well ahead of time. Unfortunately, I will no longer accept authors promoting books being released in November or beyond, since it’s (quite frankly) a pain in the ass to update posts, especially when you’re talking 150+ posts I put together for the month. You need to have everything ready to go as soon as I ask for it. 

3. You’ll be expected to do a Spotlight On interview, 2 (or more) Guest Posts and a teaser for your Zombie release. You’re also expected to share all of the other posts each day and spread the word. 

4. The goal is only 35 Zombie authors, and we had three times that many not able to get in during the Summer of Zombie event, so this will be a First Come First Served type of deal. I make ALL decisions and if you’ve been on previous tours you know I don’t take kindly to slackers and those who only promote themselves (those people won’t be on the tour again)

5. Got it? September 1st send me an e-mail to  armandrosamilia@gmail.com with WINTER OF ZOMBIE in the subject line and any questions you have and tell me you want in. I’ll begin putting the list together and asking for material asap. I create a secret group for the authors involved and all the info will be there, too. Deadline will be October 15th for all material to be in. Gives you plenty of time if accepted. NO EXCEPTIONS this year, either. You’re either 100% in or you’re not. 

6. The actual event page (where all the actual posts will go and people can join and read all of them) is now live ahead of time at WINTER OF ZOMBIE on Facebook. Join it and feel free to add all of your fans and friends, too! 

Armand Rosamilia

#WinterofZombie

Guest Post: Roger Jackson

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The Song of the Counter-Intuitive

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Roger Jackson

Every writer has their quirks, I think. Whether it be a constant supply of coffee chuckling blackly to itself beside them, or a place where the sunlight is perfect, or even, as Annie Wilkes suggests in Misery, a pair of handmade writing slippers, every writer has a gimmick of their own, perhaps even the smallest talisman or routine that greases the wheels of the writing process. A lot of writers need peace and quiet, absolute silence when they create, but it’s fair to say that most authors I’ve spoken to listen to music when they write, perhaps with the volume cranked up to its apex, rattling the kitchenware like a poltergeist, perhaps with their ears couched in the intimate embrace of an isolating pair of headphones. They listen to what they like, what relaxes them. They listen to what their characters like, or the music that’s playing in a particular scene. They listen to movie soundtracks, something that fits or sets the mood of the moments they’re creating.

I’ve done that, and sometimes it works, but I’ve found something else that works, too. Ones instinct is to listen to music that’s appropriate for a scene, the driving beats of a chase or a struggle, the sweeping strings of a romantic interlude. That works, but I’ve also found it useful to take a different approach, to think counter-intuitively about what music might accompany certain given moments.

To offer an example. I’ve a scene in a novel I’ve written where a character is confronted by a horribly twisted version of a deceased family member. Let’s give this character the entirely fake name of Steve, just in case the novel is ever sold, and someone reading this reads the novel and is like, “Hey, I know what happens in this part! Spoilers! This novel is DEAD to me!” (how’s that for writerly optimism?). Anyways, Steve is trapped with this apparition, and I’ve paced the scene very quickly, nice and terse, lots of breathless paragraphs as Steve’s scared companion tries to break into the room in which he’s trapped with something monstrous.

And it is monstrous. Like most Horror writers, I’m pretty proud of my twisted track record, proud of any moments I’ve written that have touched the reader with fear or disgust or dread. I’d like to think I’ve done a few of those, but this scene … it’s dark. It’s the darkest thing I’ve ever written, maybe. Hopefully, there’s a raw, visceral quality to it that’ll unsettle. There’s imagery, yes, but I don’t think that’s where the Horror comes from. I don’t think it comes from how the monster moves, or what it’s saying, or the terrible transformation that the dead family member seems to have undergone. I think the Horror of that particular moment comes from how heartbreaking it is for Steve to see what’s happened to someone so well-loved, so very missed. He’s terrified, yes, but if we’re playing a kind of psychological rock-paper-scissors game here, then in this instance heartbreak vanquishes terror, hands down.

And so the Horror is borne not from what Steve can see, but what he can feel, and what he feels is a terrible, empty grief, a moment that needs not a soundtrack of action, where there’s an apparition advancing and a concerned companion trying to break in fast enough to rescue him, but a sadder tune, one that reflects the core of the scene. That was the kind of music I listened to when I wrote it, and it seemed to give the sequence the tone that it needed.

I’d suggest giving it a try. Maybe you’re writing something and the words are flowing but the mood of the scene, the beating heart of it, is stuttering on the page. It might be because the coffee is cold, or the sunlight is fading, or even that your handmade writing slippers are pinching your toes, but it might be that your chosen music isn’t oiling the cogs of your imagination like it should.

It might be that you, and the moment your characters find themselves in, need a different song.

 

 

 

Roger Jackson lives in the United Kingdom, drinking tea and owning more Geeky tee-shirts than he will ever live long enough to wear, unless he lives forever, which is sort of the plan. He writes scary stories because he has to, and the most recent to scramble from the graveyard of his brain are the short story, “No-Man’s Land” in the Grey Matter Press anthology Equilibrium Overturned, and his novella, “Cradle Of The Dead” from BloodBound Books. Writing about himself in the third person really creeps him out.

 

Twitter: @jabe842

Blog: jabe842.wordpress.com

Guest Post: Kevin Bond

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Why You Should Carry A Rock in the Zombie Apocalypse

We’ve all seen the meme: “Quick! The first thing on your left is your weapon in the zombie apocalypse! What is it?”

It always ends up being a paperclip, a coffee cup, or a guitar pick, and unless you’re Riddick, none of those are going to be useful for killing zombies.

Of course, a kitchen knife isn’t far away, and you’ve probably got a baseball bat in the garage. Those of us who are more prepared may have an arsenal for backup, gun enthusiasts and knife collectors. You might even have a detailed plan for how to survive the zombie apocalypse.

I’m going to propose a different line of thinking, though, and I guarantee you’ve never thought of it before:

You should carry a rock in the zombie apocalypse.

Not a boulder, not a rock the size of a soccer ball. Just a simple stone that will fit into the palm of your hand. And it’s not a big deal if you lose this stone. It’s very easy to find a new one.

Why?

Because it will save your life.

You can carry a rock in the palm of your hand, out of sight, and it becomes a projectile weapon. You’ll need to train yourself to aim well, so throw a lot.

You could throw a knife too, but a knife is not necessarily expendable, and it’s harder to throw a knife straight than it is to throw a rock. And again, rocks are easy to find.

If you don’t have a spring-assisted knife or a straight blade in your hand already, then if you get a sudden surprise, you may not have enough time to get your knife out and ready. Holding on to a small stone means that you have an instant weapon for instant surprises, like zombies, or thieves.

A stone is much more dense than your hands, so bashing someone’s face in with it will do much more damage than you could do with your hands.

Plus, if you find yourself in a sudden end of the world situation, and you haven’t prepared for it, you may not have a weapon. Having a rock will give you something hard to hit with.

Thousands of years ago, it was common for people to be killed by stoning them. The blunt force trauma from multiple rock projectiles was enough to do major damage to a person.

You don’t need to have fancy weapons to kill someone if you have to. Carrying a rock can provide you with an easy way to distract a zombie or a person who wants to kill you or wants your stuff.
Even if you’re not under a sudden attack, it’s not noticeable that you’re holding something (go for a thinner, smooth rock), so as long as you have good aim, throwing it at the person should give you enough time to escape.

I guarantee this will work, because no one is thinking like this. Throwing rocks at people is just so unheard of.

Remember when you were a little kid and you were throwing rocks at other kids on the playground? No? Well then, I guess I was the weirdo. Anyway, your mom scolded you, and it’s kind of ingrained in your head not to throw things at people.

No one is going to suspect that you’re prepared to throw a rock at them. Practice throwing, and your impact will send them a very clear message.

There may be times when you don’t want to escape, but instead want to steal whatever that person has (remember, it’s the end of days, and just about anything goes) before they steal from you and leave you for dead. In that case, hitting them with that rock will hurt and distract them long enough for you to close in for the kill.

In case you run into a group of scavengers, though, your best bet is to run and live to fight another day.

For zombies, it doesn’t matter if that rock hurts them, because it won’t kill them, and it won’t send them down to the ground unless you throw a really mean rock. The distraction is what you’re after. Hit them to slow them down so you have enough time to grab your zombie-killing weapon, or to give yourself enough time to run past them.

For multiple zombies, throwing a rock won’t work. For groups of zombies I recommend just hightailing it out of there.

You can also use a rock as a noise distraction, for zombies or people. Use it to trick your pursuers into following the sound, or to distract them from your sneak attack!

I hope I’ve convinced you to add a rock to your arsenal of zombie weapons. It’s an easy item to get, and it has a couple of good uses in certain situations. Give yourself this edge against your enemies, and happy surviving!

 

About Kevin: Kevin Bond is the author of HelpZombies.com, a zombie-themed survivalist website. It is expanding to include makeup tutorials, survival guides, product reviews, and even a zombie shop!

Guest Post: John L. Davis IV

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“Horrors” How I See It
 
            Something dark, slimy, gruesome crawls from below, sharp white teeth bared and ready to snap closed on an unsuspecting victim.  Those teeth will easily shred flesh; the jaws can crack bone, disturbingly sexual fleshy red lips seal around jagged shards of bone and draw out the marrow. 
            This nightmare beast isn’t something from a new horror movie, or a recent novel, it’s that thing inside the reader, that creature reveling in the dark tales of horror.  It’s one side of the bloody coin of fear we readers trade in when delving into a novel of terror. 
            The other side is the cowering thing, the one hiding from the beast, afraid of the darkness, afraid of the words. 
            When reading that truly terrifying novel and you find yourself turning on every light in the house, or pulling your feet up over the edge of the bed, that’s the cowering thing that has to draw away, to hide in the light.
            But you keep reading, crawling ever deeper into the dark pit, searching out that next thing to terrify. 
            It is in the center of this duality that the reader and writer of horror can most closely examine the human condition and in far more depth, I believe, than any other genre. 
            In horror fiction the fluff of niceties is often blown away by a throat-ripping scream.  Pomp is hacked to pieces like two horny teenagers in a backwoods cabin.  You’re left with bleak and nearly hopeless circumstance.
            In that circumstance are the dark things and the light things that make us who we are and both can be difficult to look at head on, but when you read about that zombie shuffling toward the now-weaponless hero backed into a corner with nowhere to go, in that moment you are both the zombie and the hero.  The dark and the light.
            Here the beast delights, savoring the scent of fear exuded by the small thing that hides, turns away, curling toes up beneath the covers.  Then that moment has passed, and the reader moves on.
            The cowering creature reads on in hopes that the hero wins, and it can come out of hiding.  The creature lurking in dread waits silently for the next flash of panic to leap out, claws slashing, hoping to tear something away.
            This is horror the way I see it. 
Ever since I first read Dean Koontz’ “Phantoms”, or Stephen King’s “The Shining” I’ve had a  dark love affair with every nightmare inducing permutation of horror literature.  From the splatterpunk ravings of John Skip and Craig Spector, to Shirley Jackson’s dark and brooding “We Have Always Lived in the Castle,” to the twisted brilliance of Lovecraft and Poe, I have been darkled by things that claw at the imagination.
Horror, to me, is the one form of literature that shines a blacklight on humanity, revealing those things normally not seen. Then the blades or claws come out, slashing at our perceptions, permitting the reader to view the world with the flesh peeled away, the glistening redness beneath exposing the reality of all that we are and can be, both beast and simpering coward and all that lies between.
JohnDavis
John L. Davis, IV is an avid reader who enjoys adding to his ever-expanding home library and talking books with pretty much anyone at any time. John lives in Hannibal, MO, with his books, his wife — Erica, daughters — Astrid and Hannah, and their much-loved pooch — Pixie. He loves to hear from his readers, so stop by and converse about life, love, and the pursuit of zombies.  He is the author of the American Revenant series, available at Amazon.com
Americanrevenantseries.com

Guest Post: Loren Rhoads

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Twenty years ago, Imperial assassin Raena Zacari was court-martialed, entombed alive, and left for dead.  While she was imprisoned, the human empire she served unleashed a genocidal plague that wiped out the Templars.  In retaliation, the other peoples of the galaxy banded together to obliterate the Empire. The Human-Templar War is over finally, but humanity remains scattered and reviled.

 

Gavin Sloane has been hunting desperately for Raena since he lost her after a failed rescue attempt during the War.  He’s sunken to robbing Templar tombs as a way to fund his search. He never was a nice man. Looking for Raena has driven him over the edge.

 

Raena’s adopted sister Ariel Shaad made a fortune smuggling guns to the human-and-alien Coalition during the War.  She sent Gavin on his mad quest to find Raena in the first place.  She would do anything to help her sister, but money can’t make everything right.

 

Once Raena is freed, the insane war criminal who enslaved her and trained her to kill wants her back. Jonan Thallian is willing to risk everything – including his army of cloned sons – to bring her back under his control. Now it’s a race to see who kills whom first.

 

The Dangerous Type mixes action SF with adventurous space opera that grabs you from the first pages and doesn’t let go. Along with a supporting cast of smugglers, black market doctors, and other ne’er-do-wells sprawled across a galaxy brimming with alien life, The Dangerous Type has been described as La Femme Nikita meets Firefly.

 

The Dangerous Type is only the first book in Loren Rhoads’s epic trilogy, which continues with Kill By Numbers and No More Heroes.  All three books will be published by Night Shade in 2015.

 

An excerpt from Chapter 1:

 

Most of the tombs they’d entered had warehoused whole companies of bugs, the dead warriors of a single starship buried together.  Kavanaugh played his light around the inside this cavern but found only a single catafalque, an uncarved slab of obsidian in the rough center of the room.  Whoever lay atop it must be important, he thought.  Shouldn’t take too long to loot one body.  Maybe there would actually be something worth stealing this time.

 

Kavanaugh peeled off his face shield and lifted the flask, sucking down the last half of its contents as the men converged on the catafalque. “What’s a human girl doing in here?” Taki asked.

 

Curcovic teased, “Maybe you can wake her with a kiss.”

 

“ ’Cept for the dust,” Lim commented.

 

“Well, yeah, ’cept for the dust, Lim.  Damn, man, don’t you have any imagination?”

 

“Just what did you have in mind?” Lim asked skeptically.

 

“Are you sure she’s human?” Kavanaugh asked as he slipped the flask back inside his coat.

 

“I think she’s just a kid,” Curcovic added.  “No armor.  You think she was somebody important’s kid?”

 

“She’s the best thing I’ve seen on this rock so far,” Taki pointed out.  His hand wiped some of the dust from her chest.

 

Kavanaugh was crossing the uneven floor to join them when a low female voice said clearly, “No.”

 

Curcovic stumbled backward, dropping his torch and fumbling at the gun at his hip.  The corpse sat up, straight-arming her fist into Taki’s face.  Stunned, he cracked his head on the stone floor when he went down. He lay still at the foot of the catafalque.

 

Lim backed away, light trained on the figure rising in the middle of the tomb.  It was hard for Kavanaugh to make her out in the unsteady light:  a slip of a girl dressed in gray with a cloak of dusty black hair that fell past her knees.

 

Curcovic finally succeeded in drawing his gun.  The girl darted sideways faster than Kavanaugh could follow in the half-light.  A red bolt flashed out, blinding in the darkness.  Lim collapsed to the floor, cursing Curcovic.

 

The girl rounded on Curcovic, turning a one-handed cartwheel that left her in range to kick the gun from his hand.  She twisted around, nearly too quick to see, and cracked her fist hard into his chest.  Curcovic fell as if poleaxed.  Lim groaned from the floor, hands clasped over his belly.

 

None of the men were dead yet, Kavanaugh noticed.  She could have killed them as if they’d been standing still, but she’d disabled them instead.  He suspected that was because they posed no real threat to her.  Maybe she needed them alive.  He hoped that was true.

 

Cold sweat ran into Kavanaugh’s eyes.  He held the flask in his gun hand.  He’d have to drop it to draw his weapon.  If the noise caught her attention, he’d be headed for the ground before his gun barrel cleared his holster.

Loren Rhoads photo

Loren Rhoads is the author of The Dangerous Type, Kill By Numbers, and No More Heroes, the In the Wake of the Templars trilogy.  She’s the co-author of As Above, So Below with Brian Thomas. She authored Wish You Were Here: Adventures in Cemetery Travels and edited The Haunted Mansion Project: Year Two and Morbid Curiosity Cures the Blues. She’s been an active member of the Horror Writers Association since 2001.

 

The book’s home page:  http://lorenrhoads.com/writing/the-dangerous-type/

Amazon: http://amzn.to/1LT1V31

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-dangerous-type-loren-rhoads/1121330783?ean=9781597808149

Loren on Facebook: www.facebook.com/loren.rhoads.5

Loren on Twitter: http://twitter.com/morbidloren

Loren’s blog:  http://lorenrhoads.com/blog

Reblog: Armand Rosamilia Interview with Rudes review

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Armand Rosamilia, author of the Dying Days zombie series, is interviewed: 

http://www.renereviews.com/interview-with-author-armand-rosamilia/

Advertising on Arm Cast Podcast and Arm N Toof: Dead Time Podcast

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Since the switch of Arm Cast: Dead Sexy Horror Podcast to Project iRadio listenership has soared. I went from a decent amount of loyal listeners so many, many new ones and I couldn’t be happier.

I’m also excited to be one-half of the team for an upcoming second podcast on Project iRadio, Arm N Toof: Dead Time Podcast with author Mark Tufo.

Jess at Project iRadio (along with author Brian Keene) will be taking advertising for each show. We’ll either be reading spots inside the show itself or adding your radio-ready spots to the episode. Get in touch with them for what you need to do. There are many podcasts attached to Project iRadio besides these two new ones, so you can also advertise on multiple ones if you want. Just sayin’.

Interested in seeing what the rates are? Go HERE for all of the information and to ask for more info, too. Let them know I recommended you, please and thank you.

Most shows will only have up to three ads per episode, so space is very limited. Act now. Don’t delay.

Hopefully Mark Tufo and I will be reading your ad on a future episode!

ARM CAST: DEAD SEXY HORROR PODCAST

Podcast devoted to interviewing horror authors, publishers, editors, artists, filmmakers, narrators, and anyone else in the arts and entertainment fields. We also like M&Ms. Armand Rosamilia is your host.

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ARM N TOOF’S DEAD TIME PODCAST

Two hosts for the price of one. Authors Armand Rosamilia and Mark Tufo interview authors, publishers, filmmakers and anyone else they want to chat with. Not only zombie and apocalyptic peeps, either… literally anyone they want to talk to. Coming Wednesday July 8th to Project iRadio.

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Scrivener Soapbox Interview: TJ Redig Chats With Armand Rosamilia

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TJ Redig swears he had an oh-so-metal discussion with Armand Rosamilia, the author of the Dying Days series, the Keyport Cthulhu series, theFlagler Beach series, the Metal Queens series, and God-only-knows how many other things.

TJ Redig does not lie… 

http://www.tjredig.com/scrivenersoapbox/2015/5/16/2015-06-10-61-armand-rosamilia

Author Armand Rosamilia

Reblog: “Anything But Zombies” Anthology Review

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Very cool review of the latest anthology I am a part of… 

http://randomnessbybazib.blogspot.com/2015/05/anything-but-zombies-short-story.html

Anything But Zombies! Edited by Gerald Rice

Armand Rosamilia Interview on “Drinking With Jason” Podcast

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I had a rousingly crazy night being interviewed by Jason Brant on his excellent podcast… between his sweet tea and my coffee, it is a wonder we didn’t get arrested! 

http://www.authorjasonbrant.com/2015/05/drinking-with-jason-12-horror-author.html

Arm Cast Podcast: Episode 50 – World Horror Convention Part 2

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I had a blast at World Horror Convention in Atlanta, GA

I also got to meet and interview a few cool people, too!

On this episode:

Author Carl Alves

Authors T. Fox Dunham, Brick Marlin and Richard Lee Byers together!

Arm Cast Podcast Episode 50

Arm Cast Podcast: Episode 49 – World Horror Convention Part 1

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I had a blast at World Horror Convention in Atlanta, GA

I met a few cool people and interviewed them as well!

 

On this episode:

 

Patrick Beltran (Cutting Block Books)

John Palisano (author of “Dust of The Dead”)

Doug Murano and D. Alexander Ward (co-editors of “Shadows Over Main Street” anthology)

Arm Cast Podcast Episode 49

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Arm Cast Podcast: Episode 48 – Gregory And Lund

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On this week’s exciting Arm Cast Podcast you’ll hear two authors being interviewed by me. Pretty much like the previous 47 episodes had, more or less…

Samantha Gregory

Samantha Gregory was born in Northern Ireland in 1985. She is the author of several series of books including Daemon Persuasion, which was published by Mockingbird Lane Press.
She loves horror movies, reading and archery. All of her works are available to purchase through Amazon.

David Lund

Dave Lund’s Winchester Undead series combine the zombie apocalypse with practical tactical skills, prepper knowledge, conspiracy theories, intrigue, secret government agencies and characters that quickly pull you into the story. Accuracy in detail defines the background of the Winchester Undead series, with many of the themes, objects, weapons, and tactics used in the Winchester Undead series are based on the author’s experience in survival camping, prepping, law enforcement, and training. Many of the locations visited by the characters in the series are real, although often artistically changed to fit the needs of the characters and plot. There is no cache site in Maypearl that we know of, and the presence of any secret underground government facilities really depends on whom you ask, as it is regarding the presence of Chemtrails.

Now published by Winlock Press (Permuted Press), the Winchester Undead series continues to grow with more releases currently in the works. You can find the first book of the series, Winchester: Over here: http://www.amazon.com/Winchester-Over-Undead-Book-ebook/dp/B00STNF97E (just copy and paste into your browser’s URL bar). Dave Lund’s writing style and attention to detail will pull readers into the story, cheering for the good guys, and worrying about the bad, non-stop reading that puts the human condition at the front of an undead war.

Arm Cast Podcast

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Arm Cast Podcast: Episode 45 – Moncrieff And Strand

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On this week’s stellar edition of the Arm Cast Podcast, two great authors join the crew…

jh moncrieff

J.H. Moncrieff

Raised in the far north, amid Jack London’s world of dog sleds and dark winters, J.H. Moncrieff has been a professional writer all of her adult life.

During her years as a journalist, she tracked down snipers and canoed through crocodile-infested waters. She has published hundreds of articles in national and international magazines and newspapers.

When she’s not writing, J.H. loves to travel to exotic locations, advocate for animal rights, and muay thai kickbox. To get a free eBook and find out about her new releases, sign up for her newsletter: http://bit.ly/1Ek5RTO

jeff strand

Jeff Strand

Jeff Strand was born in Baltimore, Maryland, but moved to Fairbanks, Alaska when he was six months old, so his memories of Baltimore are hazy. He grew up in the cold, where he desperately wanted to be a cartoonist. Then he wanted to make video games. Then he wanted to write movies. Actually, he still wants to do all of those things, but for now he’s quite happy writing lots of demented novels.

He was nominated for the Bram Stoker Award in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012. His novel PRESSURE has been optioned for film; he’s hoping the movie will be made soon so he can scream “My baby! What have you done to my precious baby?!?”

His novels are usually classified as horror, but they’re really all over the place, from comedies to thrillers to drama to, yes, even a fairy tale.

Because he doesn’t do cold weather anymore, he lives in Tampa, Florida with his wife and a deaf cat.

LISTEN To This And All Past Episodes HERE

Guest Post: William Meikle

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THE DUNFIELD TERROR, a new tale of supernatural terror from William
Meikle launches on April 7th in limited edition hardcover, paperback and
ebook.
 
Willie says…
 
This one is set in Newfoundland and has some glowing fog, a mad scientist, lots of snow, a shipwreck, some tentacled things, a dead whale, rum, cigarettes, some boats of various sizes, a bar or two, some stiff upper lips, a shed and a multitude of universes, among other things. 
 
Some of my major influences are on show – Lovecraft of course is obvious from the title, the cover and the subject matter, but there’s also John Wyndham in there, and more than a touch of old Professor Quatermass, along with possibly bits of Doctor Who’s more trippy adventures in the timey-wimey stuff. 
 
I had an awful lot of fun with this one. I hope my readers do too. – 
 
As for the plot… 
 
It starts with a strange glowing fog that arrives at the height of a snowstorm. 
 
A terror from the past has returned, bringing with it death and destruction that threatens to overrun the town. The old stories tell of a post-war experiment gone wrong, one that opened the way for the fog — or whatever was behind it — to begin its reign of terror. 
 
A small team of workmen are the last hope to keep their town alive through the long, storm-filled night. But the many horrors that await them are beyond anyone’s worst nightmares. 
 
It’s been picking up some nice advance reviews too…like these…
 
For the Lovecraft fan and the Cthulhu Mythos enthusiasts, this is a
must read but it is also essential for those who want to read the best
in contemporary horror. – The Novel Pursuit
 
Superbly paced with wonderfully open, and likeable characters that
help this story flow across the pages at a wonderful tempo. Sometimes
edge of your seat stuff and other times set slow so you can become
totally engrossed in the story that’s being told. This is a
masterpiece – Confessions of a Reviewer
 
Scary, slimy fun with just enough gross out factor to make the reader
queasy but not so much as to become gratuitous. This is just a very
good horror novel. – Examiner.com
 
This novel would have made a classic spine chiller of a movie for
Hammer Films. – Reclusive Reads
 
What a chilling, terrifying read this was! – Cat After Dark

Guest Post: Claire C. Riley

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ODIUM III The Dead Saga

 

In this life, nothing is simple…not even DEATH

 

In the third instalment of the Odium series, having distanced herself from Mikey, Nina is on a mission. She’s seeking a woman who could be the answer to all their problems…or just another nightmare made reality.

Travelling alongside Nova, the two women are faced with countless threats and inexplicable circumstances…just another day in the land of the dead.

But Nina is changing, feeling the strain of this life, and beginning to rethink the choices she’s made and the woman she’s become. New allies will be forged on this road of self-discovery, bonds will be broken, and old enemies will resurface. Nina will be forced to make a decision that could have devastating consequences.

However life is nothing without someone to love, or a family to love you in return. And in this new world, there is only one way to prove that love is still possible. Sacrifice.

ODIUM III The Dead Saga Excerpt

 

I reached the first one, side-stepping as it stretched its one bony arm for me. The other arm was barely a nub of bone left jutting out of its socket, yet it still moved. I managed to get behind it and I raised my katana high, slamming it through the back of the deader’s neck before it could turn around. The force of my blow knocked it to its knees but didn’t cut it all the way through, and I grunted as I struggled to wrench the katana free from the thick flesh and bone of its neck. I pressed down, begging the sword not to snap.

Finally the blade cut right through and the head fell from its shoulders with a resounding splat. The body slumped forward with a thud, and thick black gore that smelled like rotten eggs and three-day-old sewage pumped slowly from out of the hole in its neck. The mouth of the head continued to snap, and I slammed my sword through the side of its temple to end the deader’s eternal misery and then I moved on to the next one.

Nova was surrounded by two deaders and the ankle-biter, and I hurried across to help her. I jogged to her side, ignoring my own slow-moving deader, and I stabbed through the ankle-biter’s skull. Ankle-biters were scary, because you never freaking saw them coming. I had drawn the attention of Nova’s two deaders, but she stabbed one in the back of the skull before it could even take a step toward me, and the other followed swiftly afterwards.

I turned back to my one, sidestepping it and letting it follow me until its back was to Nova. She used both knives to hack either side of its neck in one swift movement, and the head popped up into the air like a jumping bean and landed on the ground with a small thud. It was still moving, jaws snapping away as it persistently tried to get to me, and I grimaced. It was possibly once a fairly attractive male. Cloudy blue eyes stared up at me hungrily, its teeth still relatively normal instead of broken and black. Even its skin, though pale and sallow, was still covering a full face, instead of having rotted away in parts, leaving us with a gory view of what lay underneath. I presumed this man had died from injuries other than the more standard facial bites, which were what usually got people killed.

Death brought on the zombie infection, not saliva or blood transference, and a chunk out of the face or neck was almost always a sure killer.

Nova’s boot made contact with the head and sent it flying through the air and into the fields to the left of us. Black blood trailed through the sky in an arc and she whooped and fist-pumped the air.

“Touchdown!” she yelled ridiculously. She raised her hand in an attempt to high five me.

“That’s not cool. You need to go find that head and end it.” I bent down and wiped my blade across the now headless deader’s body, cleaning it free of the gore.

“What? Why?” She bent down and cleaned her knives on a different deader’s back. “You’re just miserable. You’re always miserable, especially when you’re sick,” she huffed.

“You don’t know what I’m like when I’m sick.”

Nova rolled her eyes. “Well you’re sick now, and you’re a moody and miserable, so looks like I was right.”

“Whatever. You can’t leave a dangerous head out in the wild like that. What if someone is walking through here and doesn’t see it? What then? A dangerous head like that could kill someone.” I scowled and stood back up, releasing a hearty sneeze. “Go find the damn head.”

Nova stood back up, giving me a hard glare. “No, you go find the damn head if it’s so important to you.” She turned away and started looking through the pockets of another of the dead bodies at our feet, looking for anything useful. “No one would be stupid enough to walk through a field barefoot anyway. People wear shoes, Nina!” She pocketed several items, not bothering to show me what they were, which only pissed me off more, since we were supposed to be sharing everything.

“That’s a dangerous head, Nova. Go kill it.” I bent back down and started to fumble in my deader’s pockets, finding some gum and a lighter, plus a picture of a pretty woman. The picture did nothing to temper my growing anger. “Do they not deserve any goddamn respect?” I muttered to myself more than her. So I was surprised when Nova replied.

“No, no they don’t. I hate them all and they deserve to die a horrible death.”

My eyes snapped to hers. “You’re being a dick now.”

“Since when did you become a union leader for the Undead Society? These aren’t humans anymore,” she snarled.

 me

Claire C. Riley Bio.

 

Claire C Riley is a Bestselling British Horror Author, whose work includes: Odium The Dead Saga – book 1, 2 and 3, Limerence 1& 2 (The Obsession Series) Odium Origins A Dead Saga Novella – book 1, 2 and coming soon 3, and several other full length novels including Thicker Than Blood co-authored with USA Today Best Selling author Madeline Sheehan.

She writes characters that are realistic and kills them without mercy.

Claire lives in the UK with her three young daughters, husband, and scruffy dog.

https://www.facebook.com/ClaireCRileyAuthor

www.clairecriley.com

http://amzn.to/1ANzOwb

GR Link – http://bit.ly/17e6HWL

“Dying Days 5” Schedule And Release Date

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Dying Days 5

I am nearing the first draft finish line for the next installment of the Dying Days series, Dying Days 5 (which is up as a pre-sale) and I am truly excited. 

For those of you who have been reading along since Dying Days (and, perhaps Darlene Bobich: Zombie Killer or the original extreme zombie novella, Highway To Hell, the story and world has progressed into even more divergent paths. Ones I am quite proud of!

With Dying Days 5 I continue to tell the story of not only Darlene Bobich, but old and new survivors as well as the zombies themselves. 

My schedule for the release will be as follows:

Today… Pre-sale of Dying Days 5 is now up. Get your copy as soon as it goes live when you pre-order. 

Sunday April 5th… Beta Readers will get their hands on a copy. I am very blessed to have some great pre-readers who offer me some valid points, and I will be reaching out to 3-5 of them right before this date to see if they have time to read and give thoughts on it. 

Tuesday May 5th… By this date I’ll have all the notes in and will have done my rewrite. Taking into account my wedding on April 18th and then the week honeymoon, and this last weekend I will be in Atlanta at World Horror Convention, I know I am cutting it close. But I do love a crazy deadline. At this point I will send it off to my editor, Jenny Adams, to start ripping it apart. 

Monday June 1st… hopefully uploading the finished copy a week ahead of schedule. 

Tuesday June 16th… Dying Days 5 will go live, right in the middle of the upcoming Summer of Zombie Blog Tour! I actually plan this each year, and have had one out during the tour. More info on the tour itself coming soon, as well… 

Armand Rosamilia

Guest Post: Adrian W. Lilly

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Werewolf trilogy looks at world under werewolf rule

Adrian W. Lilly’s The Wolf at War is the final book in The Runes Trilogy, a werewolf series that begins with a single family’s struggle against werewolves and ends with a worldwide werewolf takeover.

“The series is a werewolf odyssey,” Lilly explained. “It’s far from a typical coming of age story, but it is about personal discovery.”

From the outset of the series, werewolves, in human and beast form, are plotting against humanity. The intricacies of the plot ever-evolve as the story unfolds across the three books.

The first book in the series, The Wolf at His Door, brings together young love—even as the lovebirds discover they have dark ties to werewolves. Simultaneously, two detectives work different cases: a number of missing person’s cases and two gruesome murders. As the book progresses, the detectives determine that the cases may be related. One reviewer said the book builds to “an absolutely epic ending.”

The Wolf in His Arms opens 10 months after the end of The Wolf at His Door. Alec, Jared and Lucy work to uncover the werewolf plot against humanity. The tension builds as they travel across the country trying to find members of The Pack.

Ilene, Alec’s mother, is battling depression after the losses she suffered at the hands of the werewolves. She unwittingly stumbles upon an 80-year-old mystery and finds herself at battle with the werewolves once again. Her husband, Jason, feels isolated from the family that is keeping secrets from him. So he begins his own investigation.

The main action takes place in and around Detroit. Ilene and Jason Rune, Alec and Lucy’s parents, have moved into a downtown loft. Locales around Detroit, including Campus Martius, factor into the action. The main characters traverse the Midwest, however, visiting a small Iowa town, and Boystown Chicago, where a pivotal scene takes place on Halsted St.

“The Midwest is the perfect setting for a horror novel,” explained Lilly. “It offers major cities, small towns and countryside—all within a day’s drive.”

As the werewolves come closer to realizing their plan, the family is not the only ones in the path of destruction. Millions of lives hang in the balance, inspiring a reviewer to say this book “is like Adrian Lilly’s The Empire Strikes Back. The action comes fast and furious, the characters are virtually divided and conquered, and the situation is dire…”

Book Three opens on the same night as Book Two ends. Much of the third book is dystopian world ruled by werewolves, where humans are subjugated. The main characters are now resistance fighters, trying to find a way to stop the seemingly unbeatable army of werewolves.

An excerpt from Book One: The Wolf at His Door can be read here.

The books can be purchased at:

Amazon

Kobo

Barnes& Noble

Smashwords

iBooks

Amazon UK

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About Adrian W. Lilly

Adrian W. Lilly is the author of the novels The Devil You Know, Red Haze, and The Runes Trilogy: The Wolf at His Door, The Wolf in His Arms, and The Wolf at War. His short fiction and poetry have been published in Hello Horror, 69 Flavors of Paranoia, Nervehouse and The Weekly among other publications. He can be found online at http://www.adrianlilly.com

He is a fan of Gothic suspense movies and novels, which greatly influence his writing. Adrian’s writing focuses on strong character development and the nuances of fear that build toward horror. The mansion in his first novel, The Devil You Know, was inspired by the grand mansions in the Victorian neighborhood where he lives.

Adrian writes novels, short stories, and poetry and has spent many years as a copywriter in the advertising industry. In addition, Adrian has directed two short films and co-directed a feature-length sci-fi comedy.

My website: www.adrianlilly.com

Facebook: facebook.com/adrianwlilly

Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AdrianLilly

Twitter: @AdrianLilly1

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6545875.Adrian_Lilly

Armand Rosamilia Interview About “Hollywood Hellmouth”

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The always lovely Claire C. Riley interviewed me about my latest, Hollywood Hellmouth, a horror comedy co-written with Brent Abell, Jay Wilburn, Jack Wallen and myself…

http://www.clairecriley.com/blog/mihm2015-men-in-horror-month-presents-armand-rosamilia

HWHM