Archive for the For The Night Is Dark Category

Armand’s 2013 Year In Review Part 1

Posted in anthology, Armand Rosamilia, authors, contemporary fiction, Creeping Death, dying days, fiction, flagler beach, Flash Fiction, florida, For The Night Is Dark, Golden Lion Cafe, Hazardous Press, Heavy Metal, horror, Kokomo's Cafe, Miami Spy Games, movies, novella, personal, short story, spy, tim baker, writing, zombie on December 16, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

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I had a killer 2013… there is no doubt about it. And not only in my writing and publishing career, but in my personal life. I started dating a wonderful Special Gal in December of 2012 and we’re still going strong, I began spending more and more time in Jacksonville and really growing to love it, I got a radio gig on an actual radio station with fellow author and great friend Tim Baker, and even starred in a music video. OK, I just stood there with sunglasses on looking all menacing and sexy, but I was the real star, and not The Cherry Drops.

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What’s really left for me, with my bucket list of things to do before I die? Maybe act in a movie… but I’ll save that one for 2014 so I have something to look forward to. 

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Truth be told, 2013 started out very slow release-wise. I wrote three novellas for a Hollywood company that still have not seen the light of day, although the pay was nothing to laugh at, and was riding the wave for sales of Miami Spy Games: Russian Zombie Gun. Unfortunately, it meant no new releases for me until February, and even then it was a flash fiction piece in the Fifty Shades of Decay zombie anthology from Angelic Knight Press. 

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Over a month later, at the end of March, I had another story published in an anthology, this time in For The Night Is Dark by Crystal Lake Publishing. A couple of days later I had my first official release of 2013, but it was a non-fiction one with Metal Queens: Models 2

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April was a lot of writing for me. Even though I didn’t have many things out at this point, I’d been writing, editing and getting my work beta read like mad. I’d been pounding away at a huge project, one that was totally different for me: a contemporary fiction series that would eventually encompass 70 short stories in 7 print releases and over 40 eBook releases: Flagler Beach Fiction Series

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The first of this series was released on May 15th, Kokomo’s Cafe Part 1. Part 2 was released a week later. Then Part 3 came out at the end of the month, one new two-story part each week. June saw Part 4 and Part 5 as well as the print version of Kokomo’s Cafe and all five parts in one eBook, Kokomo’s Cafe Complete

Dying Days 3 Cover

In the meantime, at the end of May, I finally released Dying Days 3. It had a few twists and turns longtime fans weren’t expecting. In June I released Creeping Death, a collection of my short stories released by Hazardous Press. 

Creeping Death Cover

The last weekend in June saw the beginning of the second part of the Flagler Beach Fiction Series when Golden Lion Cafe Part 1 was released. Part 2 was released the first week in July, followed in subsequent weeks by Part 3, Part 4 and then Part 5

Golden Lion Print Cover

From the 1st of the year (with some breaks) through the end of July, I had 17 releases. I think I had 23 all of 2012, so 2013 was already on pace to beat it… but I had no idea how much more I was going to be putting out in 2013… 

Armand Rosamilia

Guest Blog: John Claude Smith

Posted in Armand Rosamilia, authors, Blogging, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, personal, short story, writing on April 11, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

This Darkness… 

When I signed on for the For the Night is Dark anthology, it was primarily because the cover caught my eye.  Lucky to make the cut, my next thought was: now what?  I had no idea what to write.  I was in Rome, Italy, at the time, working through some other fiction, so I put it on the back burner until I got back to the States in October, 2012, when I realized it was time to get serious about it.

The theme simmered, feeling through the dark caverns of thought… and pulled up a memory for me one morning upon awakening, a life event I could use as the foundation for the story.

Yes, there was an incident up in the mountain that triggered the story.  I had driven into the mountains east of Portland, Oregon, with an ex-girlfriend and another friend and had… an encounter.  That encounter was the starting point as the story took off from there, adding layers to a simple idea—something that often happens with my fiction—and “This Darkness…” was born. 

Stories start many ways for me, often with an image, which the incident in the mountain had burned into my brain.  I was happy to take that image and expand on it for this excellent anthology.  The title, on the other hand, was a bear, simply trying to find something appropriate.  I’m usually good with titles, having often started with just a title and creating from there, but this one, for some reason, I could not think of anything that worked, until I read and read again the story and those two words stood out, powerfully capturing the essence of what the story dealt with.  “This Darkness…”  The darkness up in that mountain; the darkness that Susie Chambers had to deal with on a much more intimate level than anyone should ever have to… 

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For The Night Is Dark

for the night is dark final cover 

Guest Blog: Joe Mynhardt

Posted in Armand Rosamilia, authors, Blogging, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, personal, short story on April 7, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

Till Death

I had to wear many hats throughout the creation of For the Night is Dark, first as creator in coming up with the theme, the cover and filling the ToC, and then as writer, publisher and assistant editor. I’ll never forget the day Ross Warren (editor) sent me the final word document for the anthology. I just couldn’t prepare it for publication before one last sweep. So I sat for 22 hours straight that day.  It was my 6th wedding anniversary, but don’t worry, my wife is getting more and more involved in the business.

It certainly wasn’t an easy project to complete, but working with such a bunch of professionals made it a journey of immense discovery and experience. Looking back, it almost feels like it was a breeze.

What was quite frustrating, was reading the amazing stories as they came in, knowing that it would still be months before the horror fans could read them. Every time a story showed up in my inbox, I jumped at the chance to read it. It of course put a lot of pressure on me to write a suitable story as well; I just couldn’t pass off the chance to share a ToC with some of my favourite authors. Would you?

In the end, it took me a few months, on and off, to finish my story, Till Death. I tried to go in another direction, where my protagonist almost finds comfort in the dark. In time, people can get used to everything, right?

You see, he’s lost in not only a physical darkness, but one of the mind that follows a horrific ordeal in ones life. Like losing a child. The pain of such an even can never truly heal, hence the title Till Death. More examples are the darkness that comes with an unknown new world, fear, torture and an uncertain future. The worst is the uncertainty of what really happened, and whether his loved ones are still alive, knowing he’d never see them or know the answer to that question. In time people get used to uncertainty, even feel safe in it. That’s when they start fearing the light, because what’s in the light can sometimes be a lot worse.

Till Death had many rewrites, so I hope I was able to capture the feeling of loss and depression I was aiming for. In parts I even hope the reader feels like they’re sinking into a deep, black pit.

 Where did the idea come from, you ask? I have no idea. Sometimes I try to think back and the earliest memory of a story is actually writing it. Who knows where these ideas come from, I just write them down.

 Joe with Cheetah

Joe Mynhardt is a South African horror writer, publisher, editor and teacher with over fifty short story publications. He has appeared in dozens of publications and collections, among them FOR THE NIGHT IS DARK with Gary McMahon and Armand Rosamilia. He will also appear in THE OUTSIDERS and CHILDREN OF THE GRAVE alongside great authors such as Simon Bestwick, Joe McKinney and others.

Joe is also the owner and operator of Crystal Lake Publishing. His editorial debut, FEAR THE REAPER, will be available by Halloween 2013.

His own collection of short stories, LOST IN THE DARK, is now available through Amazon.

Read more about Joe and his creations at www.Joemynhardt.com and www.crystallakepub.com or find him on Facebook at “Joe Mynhardt’s Short Stories”.

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For The Night Is Dark

for the night is dark final cover

Guest Blog: Mark West

Posted in Armand Rosamilia, authors, Blogging, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, personal, short story on April 6, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

Mr Stix

 

I don’t tend to write a lot of short stories these day, usually only when someone asks for one and that happened with this.  Ross Warren, who I like a lot, approached me with a simple brief – make the reader afraid of the dark– and how could I resist that?

I pondered on it for a while and nothing came, which was slightly worrying.  The deadline got closer, still nothing came and the worries increased and then it all broke in one go.  One night, I woke up as our young son climbed into bed with us and that was it – a kid, getting into the parents bed and the Dad seeing/hearing something.

The story grew quickly and organically from that point on – I used our house as the template for the location – but it wasn’t until Sam, my lead character, went into the bathroom that I realized what the monster, the Mr Stix of the title, was going to be.  I did wonder, after the initial ‘hey, that’s cool!’, how far I was going to get with it but as it turns out, it works as quite a scary image.

I used a lot of myself in the story – parental fears, childhood demons and the past not always letting go – and I think it perhaps works because of that.

 Mark West

Mark West’s short fiction first appeared in the small press in 1999 and since then he’s published over seventy short stories, two novels, a novelette and a Spectral Press chapbook which sold out four months prior to publication.  He has two novellas forthcoming from Pendragon Press – Drive and The Lost Film – and another from Hersham Horror Books, as well as a handful of short stories.

Mark lives in Northamptonshire in the UK with his wife Alison and their young son Matthew.

Website – www.markwest.org.uk

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For The Night Is Dark

for the night is dark final cover

The Dark is coming! Call your friends over. You don’t want to go through this alone.

You will be taken back into the past, down to the depths of the ocean and across the borderline between our world and the next. You will see snapshots from the lives of small children, old-time cockney gangsters and aimless stoners. You will journey into the darkest house on the darkest street, wander hospital basements and take a flight in the comfort of first class. You will meet Mr Stix.

This tome includes stories by some of the best horror writers around: G. N. Braun, Carole Johnstone, Armand Rosamilia, Daniel I. Russell, Scott Nicholson, Gary McMahon, Joe Mynhardt, Kevin Lucia, Tracie McBride, Stephen Bacon, Benedict J. Jones, Blaze McRob, John Claude Smith, Tonia Brown, Mark West, Robert W. Walker, Jeremy C. Shipp, Jasper Bark, William Meikle and Ray Cluley.

Are you scared of the dark? You will be.

Cover artist: Ben Baldwin (www.benbaldwin.co.uk)

Editor: Ross Warren

Only $15.99 for the 428 page print book, and $5.99 for the Kindle and Kobo versions.

Guest Blog: Tracie McBride

Posted in Armand Rosamilia, authors, Blogging, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, personal, short story on April 5, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

Father Figure

My involvement with the For the Night is Dark anthology came about by chance; I saw Joe Myrnhardt’s announcement of his new venture, Crystal Lake Publishing, dropped him a line to see what sort of material he was looking for, and he said, “I’m putting together this horror anthology – would you like to contribute a story?” And here we are. I’m familiar with and admire the work of about half the other contributors to For the Night is Dark. At the time of writing, I’m part way reading my contributor copy, so I predict that within a day or two, I’ll be an admirer of the work of the other half.

Very early on in my writing career, an editor gave me what I thought at the time was curious advice: draw on the myths and legends of your own culture. That advice seems to have percolated away in the murky recesses of my brain, because already this year has seen the publication of two stories inspired by Maori myths and legends, the first being The Touch of the Taniwha in FISH anthology, and the second being Father Figure.

Father Figure is a modern re-imagining of the story of Hine-nui-te-po (if you intend to read For the Night is Dark, then please don’t go off and Google her until after you’ve read it, otherwise you’ll be giving yourself a spoiler). I went for a modern day, suburban setting for two reasons. One, it gave me an excuse to play fast and loose with the details. And two, I personally find stories set literally close to home much scarier than those far away and long ago.

Another piece of advice that almost always drives my writing is, your first idea is usually your worst. The first thing I think of when I think of “dark” and “horror” is the monster that comes out of the dark. Father Figure takes it back a step, and explores what might drive someone to go into the dark.

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Tracie McBride is a New Zealander who lives in Melbourne, Australia with her husband and three children.  Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in over 80 print and electronic publications. Her debut collection Ghosts Can Bleed contains much of the work that earned her a Sir Julius Vogel Award in 2008.  She helps to wrangle slush for Dark Moon Digest and is the vice president of Dark Continents Publishing.  She welcomes visitors to her blog at http://traciemcbridewriter.wordpress.com/

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For The Night Is Dark

for the night is dark final cover

The Dark is coming! Call your friends over. You don’t want to go through this alone.

You will be taken back into the past, down to the depths of the ocean and across the borderline between our world and the next. You will see snapshots from the lives of small children, old-time cockney gangsters and aimless stoners. You will journey into the darkest house on the darkest street, wander hospital basements and take a flight in the comfort of first class. You will meet Mr Stix.

This tome includes stories by some of the best horror writers around: G. N. Braun, Carole Johnstone, Armand Rosamilia, Daniel I. Russell, Scott Nicholson, Gary McMahon, Joe Mynhardt, Kevin Lucia, Tracie McBride, Stephen Bacon, Benedict J. Jones, Blaze McRob, John Claude Smith, Tonia Brown, Mark West, Robert W. Walker, Jeremy C. Shipp, Jasper Bark, William Meikle and Ray Cluley.

Are you scared of the dark? You will be.

Cover artist: Ben Baldwin (www.benbaldwin.co.uk)

Editor: Ross Warren

Only $15.99 for the 428 page print book, and $5.99 for the Kindle and Kobo versions.

Guest Blog: Tonia Brown

Posted in Armand Rosamilia, authors, Blogging, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, personal, short story, steampunk, writing on April 5, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

How A-Muse-ing

By Tonia Brown

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Like many independent authors, I hold a day job to make ends meet. Or rather, in my case, a night job. When I am not slaving over the next short story or novel, I work the graveyard shift four days a week as a receptionist in the emergency department of a small, rural hospital. My job consists of checking folks in, collecting insurance and other information, and maintaining law and order in the waiting area for ten hours at a time. (Sure, I get bled on, puked on, and occasionally shit on, but the majority of my work lays in desk bound data entry. Boring sounding, isn’t it?) I don’t talk a whole lot about my employment, mainly because of the privacy laws there isn’t a whole lot I can discuss. As a result, I normally never feature my position, my coworkers or my medical background in my writings.

Emphasis on the normally.

My short story in the recently published anthology For the Night is Dark has been the single exception in my career so far. I approached Crystal Lake Publishing with the idea that I would write a steampunk horror, one of my favorite genres in which to dabble. Yet, when I sat down to pen a tale of terror about those things that go bump in the night, something very different resulted.

I blame the folks I work with. They got to telling hospital related ghost stories one night, and that set the tone for my muse. That bitch caught a hold of the idea and insisted I write something about it.

“No,” I said. “I want to write a steampunk-”

“I don’t give a crap what you want,” my muse said. “You’ll write what I tell you to write.”

I got real whiney then. “But I don’t want to write a medical tale. I might get in trouble.”

She snatched me up by the collar and from somewhere about her ample bosom, produced a switchblade of impressive size as she sneered at me. “You listen here, you sniveling little shit. I don’t give a fat rat’s ass if you get fired for this one, I want a medical story and I want it now. And what I say, goes. You got it?”

“Y-y-yes ma’am.”

She released me and I slumped onto my writing desk in a dejected heap. I glanced up to find her grinning down at me, rhythmically flicking that switchblade in the air like she was in the cast of Westside Story. It was then I feared for my life. That bitch would cut me if I didn’t do what she wanted. So, I wrote “Lost and Found,” a modern medical based horror, not a steampunk horror like I wanted.

Granted, that may not have been exactly how it all went down, but it sounds a lot more interesting than, “After my coworkers shared a couple of hospital ghost stories, I got a really cool idea for one, but then felt guilty because I kind of promised the folks at Crystal Lake I would do a steampunk story. Oh well…”

Easy enough to fix—just blame the muse.

We, as writers, go on about our muse all of the time, but what are we really talking about when we use the word muse? For most writers the muse is a buzz word they blame for everything from a lack of ideas to the much dreaded writer’s block, when in fact they’re just lazy. It’s simpler to blame a mythical idea for the reason you’re not writing, than it is to blame yourself. The muse is no more real than writer’s block. (I have done quite a number of blog posts on the utter lie of writer’s block, so feel free to rant at me if you disagree.) Yet we sling the word around whenever we feel dejected or lost or just plain tired. Sometimes we credit the muse when we are super productive, but not as often as when the words just won’t come. Think about it. How many times have you heard someone say, “I wrote 10k today! Thank you muse!” Not as often as you hear, “Three words today. And one of those was a lousy conjunction.  Thanks a lot, muse. You bitch.”

Okay then, Tonia, what do we really mean when we say muse?

We mean we wished we had something outside of just our willpower that controlled how and when and what we write, because wouldn’t that just be the bees knees? Placate her with enough delicious caffeine and she will turn on the creative fountain, spouting you with a word money shot like no other.

Take for instance the above scenario. Certainly there was nothing holding me to the idea of a medical based tale, yet something in my creative process wouldn’t leave the idea alone. I had a deadline, so I couldn’t write both stories. In the end, I settled for the one calling to me and ditched the other. I blamed my muse, but I suppose it was more of a blind drive toward a particular idea. An inspiration I couldn’t ignore. An out of control feeling that left me … oh hell, it was my muse commanding me, damn it!

I guess the point I am trying to make is thus: just because we recognize something as imaginary, doesn’t mean it isn’t real, but at the same time we need to remember it is real because we say so. The trouble starts when folks get caught up in this idea of a muse to the point of distraction. The key to working with her is not to give her too much credit, because while she may control the creative fountain, you always and ultimately control her.

Now if you will excuse me, I think my muse is calling me. Oh, no, that was just indigestion. Sorry!

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Tonia Brown is a southern author with a penchant for Victorian dead things. She lives in the backwoods of North Carolina with her genius husband and an ever fluctuating number of cats. She likes fudgesicles and coffee, though not always together. When not writing she raises unicorns and fights crime with her husband under the code names Dr. Weird and his sexy sidekick Butternut. You can learn more about her at: www.thebackseatwriter.com

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For The Night Is Dark

for the night is dark final cover

The Dark is coming! Call your friends over. You don’t want to go through this alone.

You will be taken back into the past, down to the depths of the ocean and across the borderline between our world and the next. You will see snapshots from the lives of small children, old-time cockney gangsters and aimless stoners. You will journey into the darkest house on the darkest street, wander hospital basements and take a flight in the comfort of first class. You will meet Mr Stix.

This tome includes stories by some of the best horror writers around: G. N. Braun, Carole Johnstone, Armand Rosamilia, Daniel I. Russell, Scott Nicholson, Gary McMahon, Joe Mynhardt, Kevin Lucia, Tracie McBride, Stephen Bacon, Benedict J. Jones, Blaze McRob, John Claude Smith, Tonia Brown, Mark West, Robert W. Walker, Jeremy C. Shipp, Jasper Bark, William Meikle and Ray Cluley.

Are you scared of the dark? You will be.

Cover artist: Ben Baldwin (www.benbaldwin.co.uk)

Editor: Ross Warren

Only $15.99 for the 428 page print book, and $5.99 for the Kindle and Kobo versions.

Guest Blog: Daniel I. Russell

Posted in Armand Rosamilia, authors, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, Kindle, personal, short story, writing on April 4, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

God May Pity All Weak Hearts

Dan Russell Author Pic

The inspiration actually came from Gary McMahon (I’m pretty sure). I was thinking about the darkness theme and saw a fantastic piece of art work on his Facebook page (I’m sure it was you, Gary). I had that image in mind and needed a story to place it in.

I’d reread Dracula and wanted to write something in this style: a series of diary entries at the turn on the century. Pieces began coming together, and a murder from that time fit the bill. The killer I had in mind, and it’s a harrowing real life story, had written a series of letters within prison. I read them, studied them and tried to capture his voice. I think I did quite well actually. While I added a supernatural element, I think the story captures his tragic heart and good intentions. The title, God May Pity All Weak Hearts, is a direct quote from one of his letters.

It was a massive jump out of my comfort zone,but this is one of my favourite short stories: creepy, heartbreaking and ultimately, dark.

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Australian Shadows Award finalist Daniel I. Russell has been featured publications such as The Zombie Feed from Apex, Pseudopod and Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #43. Author of Samhane, Come Into Darkness, Critique and The Collector, Daniel is also the current vice-president of the Australian Horror Writers’ Association and was a special guest editor of Midnight Echo.

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For The Night Is Dark

for the night is dark final cover

The Dark is coming! Call your friends over. You don’t want to go through this alone.

You will be taken back into the past, down to the depths of the ocean and across the borderline between our world and the next. You will see snapshots from the lives of small children, old-time cockney gangsters and aimless stoners. You will journey into the darkest house on the darkest street, wander hospital basements and take a flight in the comfort of first class. You will meet Mr Stix.

This tome includes stories by some of the best horror writers around: G. N. Braun, Carole Johnstone, Armand Rosamilia, Daniel I. Russell, Scott Nicholson, Gary McMahon, Joe Mynhardt, Kevin Lucia, Tracie McBride, Stephen Bacon, Benedict J. Jones, Blaze McRob, John Claude Smith, Tonia Brown, Mark West, Robert W. Walker, Jeremy C. Shipp, Jasper Bark, William Meikle and Ray Cluley.

Are you scared of the dark? You will be.

Cover artist: Ben Baldwin (www.benbaldwin.co.uk)

Editor: Ross Warren

Only $15.99 for the 428 page print book, and $5.99 for the Kindle and Kobo versions.

Guest Blog: Kevin Lucia

Posted in authors, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, short story on April 3, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

trainslucia

I’ve always loved model train layouts. Growing up, we had a modestly-sized – but very detailed – HO scale model train layout in our basement. Hours were spent running the trains, and still more hours spent planning the layout I’d build someday. When I was old enough, I began collecting bits and pieces for layouts – track, buildings, rolling stock (cars), engines, cabooses, terrain materials – and boxing them away in big green totes for the day I’d finally build my own layout.

For several years, I scoured yard sales and train shows, slowly collecting my own materials. I built several small sets for different organizations – youth clubs, etc – practicing and honing my skills. Learning little tricks along the way, like the fact that paper mache – newspaper and glue water – is just as effective and much cheaper than plaster, or that corrosion can be scoured off old tracks with a penny. 

My former fiance’s father had a basement-sized replica of our city. It was immense and beautiful. When we broke off our engagement, they only thing I really missed was that layout. 

The seed for this story took root nearly a year ago, during our family’s visit to the Roberson Science Center‘s annual Christmas celebration. At some point in the night, I became enthralled with the center’s always beautiful layout, dreaming of the day I’d finally get the chance to work on my own. I thought of how many hours I’d likely spend laying down track, crafting terrain, molding mountain regions….how many hours I’d spend lovingly creating my own little world.

And then I thought…what if that train layout was all I had?

What if, even more than that…it was the center of my world?

What if I loved being a Creator far too much…and lived in a strange little town where strange things happen when strange people believe in something TOO much?

A year later came “On A Midnight Black Chessie.” I hope everyone enjoys reading it, as much as I enjoyed writing it.

And someday, maybe I’ll finally get a chance to build my own little world…of course, if I don’t get a chance to, maybe that’ll be for the best…

 author1

Kevin Lucia is a Submissions Reader for Cemetery Dance Magazine and his podcast “Horror 101” is featured monthly on Tales to Terrify. His short fiction has appeared in several anthologies.

He’s currently finishing his Creative Writing Masters Degree at BinghamtonUniversity, he teaches high school English and lives in Castle Creek, New York with his wife and children.

He is the author of Hiram Grange&The Chosen One, Book Four of The Hiram Grange Chronicles. His first short story collection, Things Slip Through is forthcoming in November. He’s currently working on his first novel.

 

 For The Night Is Dark

for the night is dark final cover

 

The Dark is coming! Call your friends over. You don’t want to go through this alone.

You will be taken back into the past, down to the depths of the ocean and across the borderline between our world and the next. You will see snapshots from the lives of small children, old-time cockney gangsters and aimless stoners. You will journey into the darkest house on the darkest street, wander hospital basements and take a flight in the comfort of first class. You will meet Mr Stix.

This tome includes stories by some of the best horror writers around: G. N. Braun, Carole Johnstone, Armand Rosamilia, Daniel I. Russell, Scott Nicholson, Gary McMahon, Joe Mynhardt, Kevin Lucia, Tracie McBride, Stephen Bacon, Benedict J. Jones, Blaze McRob, John Claude Smith, Tonia Brown, Mark West, Robert W. Walker, Jeremy C. Shipp, Jasper Bark, William Meikle and Ray Cluley.

Are you scared of the dark? You will be.

Cover artist: Ben Baldwin (www.benbaldwin.co.uk)

Editor: Ross Warren

Only $15.99 for the 428 page print book, and $5.99 for the Kindle and Kobo versions.

Guest Blog: Gary McMahon

Posted in authors, For The Night Is Dark, guest blog, horror, personal, short story on April 2, 2013 by Armand Rosamilia

 

Author_funky

The Darkest Room in the Darkest House on the Darkest Part of the Street

With this one, the title came first.

 

It often happens that way with me. A title will pop into my head, and then slowly, painfully, a story will take form around that nucleus. Lately I’ve been using a lot of these long, wordy titles; it just seems to be the way my mind works right now. Short titles don’t interest me as much; for some reason they seem to lack inspiration. That’ll change at some point, but for the moment I’ll work with what I have.

 

With something like The Darkest Room in the Darkest House on the Darkest Part of the Street I knew I had to pick a tone, or voice, for the story that reflected the rhythm of the title. It’s almost sing-song in nature, like a line from a nursery rhyme, so naturally the idea of a dark urban fairy tale came to mind. Much later, I found out the line is also used in a well-known children’s’ book. I liked the symmetry of that.

 

My narrator forced himself into the story immediately, so I knew from the start it would be written as a first person narrative. Those first lines just flowed onto the page. After that, it was easy. The first draft only took me a few days to complete. This was one of those tales that almost seem to write themselves; all I had to do was transcribe the nightmare. I wish they were all like that. It would make life a lot easier.

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Gary McMahon is the acclaimed author of nine novels and several short story collections. His latest novel releases are BEYOND HERE LIES NOTHING (the third in the Concrete Grove series, published by Solaris) THE END (an apocalyptic drama published by NewCon Press) and THE BONES OF YOU (a supernatural mystery published by Earthling Publications), and his short fiction has been reprinted in various “Year’s Best” volumes.

Gary lives with his family in Yorkshire, where he trains in Shotokan karate and likes running in the rain.

Website: www.garymcmahon.com

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For the Night is Dark

for the night is dark final cover

The Dark is coming! Call your friends over. You don’t want to go through this alone.

You will be taken back into the past, down to the depths of the ocean and across the borderline between our world and the next. You will see snapshots from the lives of small children, old-time cockney gangsters and aimless stoners. You will journey into the darkest house on the darkest street, wander hospital basements and take a flight in the comfort of first class. You will meet Mr Stix.

This tome includes stories by some of the best horror writers around: G. N. Braun, Carole Johnstone, Armand Rosamilia, Daniel I. Russell, Scott Nicholson, Gary McMahon, Joe Mynhardt, Kevin Lucia, Tracie McBride, Stephen Bacon, Benedict J. Jones, Blaze McRob, John Claude Smith, Tonia Brown, Mark West, Robert W. Walker, Jeremy C. Shipp, Jasper Bark, William Meikle and Ray Cluley.

Are you scared of the dark? You will be.

Cover artist: Ben Baldwin (www.benbaldwin.co.uk)

Editor: Ross Warren

Only $15.99 for the 428 page print book, and $5.99 for the Kindle and Kobo versions.

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