Reblog: Is The Ebook Market Shrinking?


http://nicholasrossis.me/2017/10/21/is-the-ebook-market-shrinking/

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Interview: Brandon Lawson


 

  • What is Eden’s End about?

Eden’s End follows the journey of Gabriel who’s an angel, and his human friend who hunts down supernaturals who harm humans. They’re daily jobs come to a halt, when several supernaturals and humans come into pursuit of a powerful entity known as Eden which has the power of creation and destruction. Now Gabriel and Roy must race against these people to find Eden before it falls into the wrong hands.

  • When will the show be out, and where?

We are expecting to release it sometime this Fall, and the episodes will be on YouTube. At first, the entire pilot will be released, and afterwards the episodes will be broken up into segments.

  • Being independent, how is Eden’s End being made?

In terms of funding, we have set up an Indiegogo page that will help gather funds for the production of the entire season 1 for the show.

  • What are the recent successes for leading up to the show?

So far we have released a concept trailer and a short film that kind of serves as a sneak peek to the show. They both have been received well especially on Facebook where the concept trailer has over 11k views, and the short film has gained over 20k views and has been shared by a popular movie trailer page. Will are also submitting the short film to film festivals.

  • What is your role in the web series?

I am one of the screenwriters for the episodes. I have help to write the pilot, along with our concept trailer and short film of the web series.

  • Why did you want to write for the series?

My brother’s friend approach me because my brother told him how I wrote stories. I like to write, and this was a way for me to expand on my writing since I was already writing short stories for my website, I wanted to add to it.

  • What is your experience in writing?

I have been writing creatively for 2 years. I have written 22 fictional short stories which I posted on my website. Their genres range from crime, horror, science fiction, and more. I have also written a few movie articles. 1 of my short stories have been published in my college’s magazine. On top of that I am currently working on a science fiction book of short stories which I plan on putting out on Amazon sometime next year.

 

  *   *   *   *   *

 

Youtube channel for the show:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCg_Riw1VM-sYALWOvLe8xtQ

Facebook page for the show:

https://www.facebook.com/edensendtv/

Instagram page for the show:

https://www.instagram.com/edens.end/

Indiegogo page:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/eden-s-end-horror-science-fiction-web-series#/

My website:

https://www.bwlawson.com

Guest Post: Sam Mortimer


 

Amplifying Screams

Sam Mortimer

 

Some stories require us to create our own ‘Big Bang’, so to speak. In fiction, it’s your world and your rules, but it’s always interesting to make these rules viable. A book can be potent and meaningful if it displays a believable reality, or resembles one. Resonation is an important word. If my novella Screams The Machine connects with a single person and speaks to her or him, it would be a great honor.

Screams The Machine probably started brewing whilst reading about some mind-expanding quantum physics, socioeconomic concerns, technological advancements, existentialism, and the figurative blender of the human condition. I began wondering about the ebb and flow of progress. There’s plenty of material there to pull from, which made me feel all sorts of strange ways about the ‘powers that be,’ and some organizations that have sway over humanity’s future.  I came to understand a certain mindset for what it was, ‘Own the resources, own the people.’

Various books kept me busy to the point of cerebral overload. House of Leaves, by Mark Z. Danielewski blew my mind. The Holographic Universe, by Michael Talbot, was intensely interesting.  The Hellbound Heart, by Clive Barker. The Power of Myth, Joseph Campbell with Bill Moyers.  Will Storr Vs. The Supernatural, by Will Storr. Stephen King’s Danse Macabre. The list could obnoxiously go on during that time period.

Playing an older video game called FEAR helped influence Screams The Machine. The game is a great mixture of horror and science fiction. It’s a first-person shooter, and the world is dark, ominous, and you feel the direness of its plot. The game engine might be outdated now, but playing and beating FEAR amplified some internal noise to accomplish some writing goals.

There were also some raw, basic facts I began realizing about existing. I wanted Screams The Machine to display these facts either directly or symbolically. For example, some realizations were as simple as eating. Whether anyone is vegan, vegetarian, paleo, omnivorous, or whatever they choose to be, we destroy things and consume them—table manners and silverware are very nice, but they don’t change the fact we’re eating the death of something. Then again, I just might be unconsciously repeating what I learned in Humanities class, years ago. For the record, I love a good medium-rare steak—I’m not attempting to take any moral high-ground.

A psychological sense should haunt Screams The Machine as well, an aspect pertaining to incorporeal matters. It’s important to figure out who we are as individuals. What if an advanced organization figures you out first? They know everything, even your thought process. What if they monitored your darkest secrets, dreams, and fetishes? What if we live in a self-aware universe?

I’d completed a few tales before, but Screams The Machine was the first one that felt imperative to write. It seemed like the story was actually happening, and I was a reporter telling you about a perilous reality. I felt visited by a muse, if you will, in all of her badass glory, and she cranked up the mental tunes like a rock ‘n roll champ. A primal fire sparked, and it became impossible to prevent Screams The Machine from happening, for better or worse.

 

Synopsis

 

Cash carries a disease; one that’s already killed a large majority of the population and something needs to be done. To stop the crisis from escalating, The Solution (a worldwide organization) is formed and rises to great power. They monitor people’s dreams and shape reality to fit their own wants and needs. In an effort to control existence itself, The Solution is searching for what they believe to be the ultimate tool; a person with the ability to master a deep connection with the mysterious, pervasive energy known only as The Ultimate Reality.

 

Watching her neighborhood decay, her friends and family perish, Elizabeth Reznik needs to find meaning in her life. She discovers her existence is more meaningful than she could ever have imagined. Operatives of The Solution seek her out, take her from her home and perform brutal experiments on her. Their conclusion? Elizabeth is the one they have been searching for; she is the key to gaining complete power.

 

The stratagem of The Solution is single minded – own the resources and you own the people. And the last resource available is free will. They will own your thoughts, they will orchestrate your dreams; they will dine on your fears. But there is always a cog in the machine… or in this case, a scream.

 

Available on:

Amazon:

US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil | India | The Netherlands

Amazon Print: US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil | India | The Netherlands

iTunes | Kobo | Barnes & Noble | Smashwords | CreateSpace (Print)

 

 

Sam Mortimer has worked the graveyard shift in law enforcement, attended film school, and has been writing strange stories since age eleven. He loves reading, music, and strives to meet the demands of his five cats.

 

Guest Post: Maynard Blackoak


maynardblackoak_eerietrailsofthewildweirdwest_frontcover_final

Musical Inspiration for the Wild Weird West

Maynard Blackoak

 

Writing takes me down many paths through the tales I spin.  Each dusty trail taken was influenced in a different manner.  Sometimes, it is something as simple as a grouping of trees around a large sandstone boulder.  Other times, an old film sparks a flame of creativity.  Many things activate the part of my brain that manufactures the stories I write.  However, music is one of the most important tools used for inspiration.

A particular song can put me in the saddle in the middle of a cattle drive.  Often, a tune can make me smell the leather of the saddle beneath me and feel the sun on my forehead, or a cold rain slapping my face.  Music can remove my mind from my body and teleport it through space and time to an era when vigilante justice was meted out quickly with a gun or a noose.

In my collection of Wild West collides with horror tales, Eerie Trails of the Wild Weird West, music was instrumental in nearly all my yarns.  Though most of the stories in this collection were not directly inspired by a particular song, listening to a special song put me in a proper frame of mind.  On some occasions, I listened to the same song repeatedly as I weaved the fabric of a tale.

Take the story, Willows of the Mourning Dove; I listened to Running Bear by Sonny James several times, as I penned the tale.  Though the character of Mourning Dove was very loosely based on the female love interest in the song, little else about the story resembles the tune.  Still, the music and lyrics inspired me as I wrote.  Had I listened to another song while I put words to page, the story would have most likely taken a different path.

While inking The Jonah Herd, there were two songs on my playlist, Stampede by Chris Ledoux and Rawhide by Frankie Laine.  Other than both using a cattle drive as the subject matter, nothing about the story suggests a tie to either tune.  Nonetheless, both kept my mind firmly planted on a trail drive.  Both brought me to a place where I could feel the mud from the hooves of horses and cattle hitting my face and see the rain as it dripped from the brim of my hat.

As I sat writing The Guns of Clay Allison, the tune Big Iron by Marty Robbins played almost exclusively.  There is absolutely no link between the song and tale, but I knew I needed to listen to it if I was to pen the story.  It gave me the sense of using a primitive six-shooter and filled my nose with the scent of spent gunpowder.

In the story Collateral Winds, the song Seven Spanish Angels by Willie Nelson and Ray Charles inspired and influenced the story.  A tale of a path taken leading to regret and remorse, the impact the tune had on the storyline is evident.  Sometimes, decisions made affect not only the people in our sight, but also others we fail to notice.  Both the story and song depict the ramifications of a life lived by the gun.

The Devil’s Herd was inspired by two songs, Ghost Riders in the Sky by Johnny Cash and to a lesser extent, El Paso by Marty Robbins.  Elements of this story are derived from the lyrics of both tunes.  Though I listened to the latter more often, the other had more influence on the path the story took.  The imagery created by both songs helped set the tone of a long ride across a barren landscape in brutal heat to an unknown destiny.

As you read the dusty tales in Eerie Trails of the Wild Weird West, feel free to play the forementioned songs or create a playlist of your favorite cowboy tunes.  Let the music and the stories take you back in space and time to a rowdy era where vigilante justice was the law and guns ruled the land.

 

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Eerie Trailsof the Wild Weird West

In this collection of fourteen strange tales from the wild west, Cowboys and Indians face down supernatural beings of all varieties – from vampires and werewolves; to ghosts and vengeful spirits; to mythological creatures.

Saddle up cowboys and ladies alike, once the journey begins, Eerie Trails of the Wild Weird West will take you down a strange and bizarre path though the old west that you’ve never been on before.

Available on:

Amazon: US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil |India |

The Netherlands

Amazon Print: US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil |India |

The Netherlands

Barnes & Noble

Kobo

Smashwords

CreateSpace (Print)

 

maynardblackoak

 

About the Author — Maynard Blackoak is a freelance writer living in the backwoods of Pawnee County, Oklahoma. He draws upon the sights of neglect and unusual sounds around him for inspiration. A bit of a recluse, he can often be found strolling through an old, forgotten cemetery or in the woods among the twisted black oaks and native elms under the light of the moon.

Twitter: @maynardblackoak

Facebook: Maynard Blackoak

Guest Post: Jessica B. Bell


viscera_frontcover_promo

Music to Write Horror By

Jessica B. Bell

When I write, I always have music playing, sometimes just ambient instrumental music – Brian Eno has several great soundscape albums that are great – but often I want a certain mood to write by. When I was writing a lot of the stories in Viscera I would often have these on in the background.

Godspeed You! Black Emperor – F#A#(Infinity) : This is an album by a Canadian band known for its long, experimental soundscapes, combining live music with soundbytes and spoken word. It’s dark and atmospheric, and is my go to when writing. If you’ve seen the brilliant film 28 Days Later, you may recognize their song East Hastings/Dead Flag Blues. It has a spoken word piece at the beginning of the song about being trapped in the belly of a machine that is bleeding to death that gives me chills:

King Crimson – In the Court of the Crimson King:  Someone once said that this music was the sound of the apocalypse, and they might be right. The title track has been used in the dystopian film Children of Men and is instantly recognizable. If I’m ever writing something with some sort of demon or elder god in it, this is the record I put on. It’s grand and cinematic, and if you’re going to be writing something bleak, this is the track you want to be listening to.

Tom Waits – Mule Variations:  When I was writing CHUK – a novel set in the Louisiana bayou – this was on my turntable nearly constantly. It’s a great album altogether, but Low Side of the Road could be the theme song for the HBO adaption of CHUK (it’ll happen, you’ll see). There’s just something about Tom Waits’ gravelly voice and Kurt Weill-esque musical sensibilities that make his music excellent for creepy writing.

Nine Inch Nails – The Downward Spiral: Nobody does anger quite so eloquently as Trent Reznor, and if you are writing something intended to make the skin crawl – or if you’re just writing something bloody violent and angry, then you want to throw on this album, beginning to end. The industrial noises in the song Reptile sound like Godspeed’s horrible machine, bleeding to death. If they ever made a film out of my story Paraxenogenesis, this would be the soundtrack.

Sigur Rós – Ágætis Byrjun: I have no idea what this Icelandic band is singing about , but it is dark and lovely. It’s actually very soothing, and puts me in a mood to write. There’s a short story in Viscera – my new collection of strange tales, published by Sirens Call Publications (and available now) called The Queen is Dead that could definitely be read with Sigur Rós playing in the background.

Finally, Pink Floyd’s near-instrumental Careful With That Axe, Eugene was the inspiration for the story Banshee (also in Viscera). The song just sounds like a chase across barren, icy tundra. Listen to this song before (or while) you read the story, and I think you’ll see what I mean.

What music do you listen to while writing? Is it just your personal favourites, or does the music you listen to influence your writing, and if so, in what way?

jessicabbell

Jessica B. Bell is a Canadian writer of strange fiction. It is rumoured that she lives in a damp, dark basement, writing her twisted tales in her own blood on faded yellow parchment. Her stories have been published in various anthologies, the most recent of which is Voices. She also writes under the name Helena Hann-Basquiat, and has published two novels on the metafictional topic of Jessica B. Bell, titled Jessica and Singularity. A third and final novel is planned for 2017.

Find more of Jessica’s (and Helena’s) writing at whoisjessica.com

Viscera — Jessica B. Bell

Viscera is a collection of short stories full of all the things that make you squirm, cringe, and laugh when you know you shouldn’t. You’ll remember why you’re afraid of the dark and experience an abundance of weird creatures: witches, ancient gods, and all-too-human monsters – the scariest of all.

Indulge your twisted sense of humor with stories about unconventional werewolves and a woman with a frog fetish. Know what it’s like to arrive too late to save an unusual alien abductee, or giggle with sick delight as a woman serves up a special Hasenpfeffer dinner to her pig of a husband.

Settle in for bedtime stories fit for monsters.

Viscera will grab you by the gut and squeeze, making you cry for mercy—or laugh like a fiend!

Available on:

Amazon:

US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil | India | The Netherlands

Amazon Print:

US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil | India | The Netherlands

Kobo

Barnes & Noble

Smashwords

iTunes

Authors Supporting Our Troops Winding Down #ASOT2016


ASOTbumpersticker

It’s been a truly remarkable run for the Authors Supporting Our Troops event the past three years. With your help we’ve been able to collect over 7,500 author-signed books for soldiers in remote areas of the world. We’ve helped put smiles on faces. Let a soldier forget about where they are for a few hours and read some good books. 

But as the end of 2016 approaches in a few months I had to take a hard look at what is going to be the future instead of just the past. 

While our goal of breaking the 3,500 books in won’t be happening (we’re currently sitting at about 1,000) I think it’s also a good sign. It is getting harder to find soldiers in remote areas thanks to troops being pulled from bad places and sent to bases in neutral or allied countries. We’ve raised enough money to send out the books we have and any stray boxes coming in from authors who still want to take part in this great event. 

I’m going to set a ‘soft’ cutoff date of November 1st 2016 to get me your signed books. What this means: I’ll still take them after the date but not going to push it or announce it. You’ll only read it here, on this post. Once I amass enough books (50 per box usually) I’ll search for another soldier to ship out to. 

Going forward… I’m sure there will be a small event in 2017. It might only be a 2-3 month window where I will be actively collecting signed books as well as soldiers. 

Speaking of soldiers: I need a few more addresses to send the boxes already sealed to ship, so if you know anyone in a remote area (any branch of military) please email me asap so I can get them books. Email is  armandrosamilia (at) gmail (dot) com

It has been my honor to run this event for the past three years and the level of authors and people donating has been unreal. I want to thank each and every one of you for being so generous.

The Authors Supporting Our Troops Facebook Page will stay active as well. 

Armand

ASOTbox4

YOUR Favorite Horror Books – May 31st Edition


Sadly, this will be the last installment of what I thought would be a fun exercise in helping other authors… not many people suggested books and I’m not going to ‘remind’ people to get their suggestions in. Also, far too many authors tried to suggest their own books or posted on the comments even though I said not to. Once some authors saw it was to help other authors and not themselves they tuned out. Very sad. 

Here are the final suggestions. I want to thank everyone who played along and tried to help authors as well as have some fun with this:

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http://amzn.to/20RmRLz

Based on the best-selling, award-winning graphic novel series Locke & Key – written by acclaimed suspense novelist Joe Hill (NOS4A2, Horns) and illustrated by Gabriel Rodriguez – this multicast, fully dramatized audio production brings the images and words to life.

A brutal and tragic event drives the Locke family from their home in California to the relative safety of their ancestral estate in Lovecraft, Massachusetts, an old house with powerful keys and fantastic doors that transform all who dare to walk through them. As siblings Tyler, Kinsey, and Bode Locke discover the secrets of the old house, they also find that it’s home to a hate-filled and relentless creature that will not rest until it forces open the most terrible door of them all….

Featuring performances by Haley Joel Osment (Entourage, The Sixth Sense), Tatiana Maslany (Orphan Black), Kate Mulgrew (Orange Is the New Black, Star Trek: Voyager), Joe Hill, Gabriel Rodriguez, and Stephen King (The Stand, 11-22-63), as well as a cast of more than 50 voice actors, this audio production preserves the heart-stopping impact of the graphic novel’s astounding artwork through the use of richly imagined sound design and a powerful original score.

*Locke & Key contains explicit language and adult situations.

(suggested by Malinda Gibson, who said: it scared the be-jesus outta me)

*   *   *   *   *

51t3cqbsQwL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_

http://amzn.to/1XbEIiM

Human flesh tacos, hardcore wrestling, and angry cannibal Mexicans…
Welcome to the Border!

The no-man’s land on the United States/Mexico border is the perfect place for getting away with any crime. With the right connections and with the right amount of money you can run drugs, smuggle people, commit murder, and do much worse.

Felix and Marta came to Mexico to film a documentary on illegal immigration. When Marta suddenly goes missing, Felix must find his lost love in the small border town. A dangerous place housing corrupt cops, borderline maniacs, drug gangs and something much worse… something to do with a strange Mexican food cart…

From Shane McKenzie, one of the most imaginative new voices in horror comes a south-of-the-border Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

(suggested by Frank Edler, who said: MUERTE CON CARNE is easily the best horror story I’ve read in quite some time. Author Shane McKenzie evokes the brutal spirit of Richard Laymon and finishes with an ending so dark it makes the bleakest ending of a Brian Keene novel look like the Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah finale in Song of the South. MUERTE CON CARNE is tacos, luchadores and long pig and that’s just the fun parts!)

*   *   *   *   *

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http://amzn.to/1P0Qowj

Vivienne realizes she is dying. All she wants to do is see her daughter Giselle one last time and apologise. But Giselle no longer exists and it is Crow, a gender-queer anarchist, who returns to a family home that is plagued by ghosts and violent memories.

With the help of a shaman ze met in a dream, Crow unravels terrifying family secrets, hoping to find closure at last. But can anyone survive the shadows that lurk behind these fairy tales?

(suggested by Jack Wallen)

*   *   *   *   *

Armand’s Bonus Suggestion

51kb3cqVZpL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_

http://amzn.to/1XbGTCX

They’re coming. They are a race of sadistic spirits known as the Curburide, and they are about to arrive in our world, bringing with them horrors beyond imagination. The secret to summoning — and controlling — them has fallen into the hands of a beautiful, sexy and dangerously insane woman.

Ariana has dedicated her life to unleashing the demons in our realm through a series of human sacrifices, erotic rituals of seduction and slaughter. As she crosses the country, getting ever closer to completing her blood-drenched mission, only three figures stand in her way: Joe, an unwilling hero who has seen the horrors of the Curburide before, Alex, a burgeoning witch … and a spiteful demon with plans of his own.

(suggested by Armand who said: It’s really hard to pick just one of his books. Great author. Highly recommended. One of my favorites)

*   *   *   *   *

Once again, thank you for everyone who suggested a book and played by the rules. I really do appreciate it!

Armand