Writing: Tics and traps to consider

I used ‘all hell broke loose’ and ‘suddenly’ in Dying Days 4, which Robert was kind enough to read and blurb. Now he’s using it against me. Nice move.

C h a z z W r i t e s . c o m

We all have tics in our writing that show up as we revise our manuscripts. I think it was Elmore Leonard who said we shouldn’t use, “all hell broke loose,” and “suddenly.” I actually don’t see a problem with suddenly, but because Elmore Leonard didn’t like it, I’m too chicken to use it. I also think adverbs get a bad rap, though I use them sparingly.

Here are some more things that get repeated in manuscripts you should consider leaving out for a faster, easier and clearer read.

1. When you can say it in fewer words, do so. (General guideline. No, this doesn’t mean all novels should be reduced to their three-paragraph summaries. Yes, we’d all be better read, but it’s about the journey.)

2. When you can use a simpler word instead of an unfamiliar one, consider that. I use some Latin and unusual words in This Plague of…

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2 Responses to “Writing: Tics and traps to consider”

  1. Nobody knew until you announced it. Why are you hitting yourself? Why are you hitting yourself!

    (And thanks for the reblog.)

    Like

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