Guest Post: Dan Padavona

Dark Vanishings series

If I had a dollar for every time someone told me, “I liked the book, but the movie was scarier,” I’d be a rich man.

Let me be clear about one thing. It is hard to frighten someone with the written word alone. I don’t care if your name is Ketchum, King, or Laymon. Scaring people with mere words is incredibly difficult and is only fleetingly accomplished, even by the most gifted horror writers.

The truth is that horror movies hold significant advantages over novels when it comes to delivering scares. While films, due to their brevity, cannot compete with books for character and plot depth, films take advantage of musical score, strong acting performances, camera angles, and innovative direction. And although cliche’, the horror movie can also deliver “jump scares,” momentary shock scenes – for example, the killer leaping out of the closet, or the false jump scare, where the hissing cat suddenly bounds across the set – which are almost impossible to replicate in printed form.

Yet authors have managed to frighten readers since the advent of horror fiction, and for my money, Salem’s Lot by Stephen King and Intensity by Dean Koontz are the most heart-pounding examples. But how should a writer attempt to frighten a reader?

The Slow Burn

The trend in fiction and film is to deliver action immediately, and while I don’t disagree with this methodology, I believe it is less than optimal when it comes to horror.

My horror fiction employs a slow burn, a creeping dread if you will, similar to the gradual builds of 1970’s horror films (think Black Christmas and The Exorcist). Similar pacing dates as far back as horror has existed as an art form, yet it was perfected by Alfred Hitchcock and leveraged by the classic horror films of the 1970s.

Everything begins with characterization. A book should contain characters which the reader can get behind and put emotional stock into, whether the characters are villains or heroes. The reader should believe in and care about the character. Then, when the character is put into jeopardy, the reader’s natural reaction is to become stressed. This alone isn’t enough to frighten the reader, but it’s a necessary beginning.

Read a Clive Barker or Stephen King novel, and pay particular attention to the author’s pacing during a frightening scene. In most cases, a slow burn is utilized. Nothing is rushed, and the scene is allowed to unfold gradually. When done to perfection, the horror broods and broods until the reader realizes she has been trapped and is without an escape route.

Let’s take the classic example of the monster or boogeyman hiding in the closet.

If I come right out and show you the boogeyman, I’m not likely to frighten you. Inside of a movie, I could use a cheap jump scare to get you to drop your popcorn, but in fiction I have no such advantage. In order for me to frighten you, the scene must unfold with near perfection.

For one thing, you’ll need to feel a sense of place. If the boogeyman is hiding in the closet, I haven’t done my job until I walk you from the kitchen to the bedroom and sit you upon the bed with cookie in hand. You need to feel the cookie crumbs on the bed sheets. You need to see the room – the lamplight pooling around the base of the nightstand and dying in the middle of the room, the Black Sabbath poster scotch-taped to the paint-chipped wall, the way the bed sheets and blankets covering your chest and legs won’t stretch past your neck.

And even then you won’t believe the boogeyman exists. But if I place you in that desolate room and make you hear the muffled rumble of the television through the floor, so that no matter how loud you scream, your parents won’t hear you, then I’m at least halfway home. Because once your closet door starts to creak open, and once those shadows start to spill into the bedroom like a black ocean, I need you to be that kid in the bed.

And then if I do everything right, and if I catch you in a receptive mood, I might just chill you to the bone with the written word.

Don’t Let Them Run Away

Think about how expert directors like Hitchcock paced their scenes, allowing the disquiet to simmer before the monster was unleashed. The shower scene of Psycho didn’t open with Norman Bates holding the knife. We followed Janet Leigh through the dingy motel room, watched her peel her clothes off and step into the shower, and saw from her perspective the spray cascading down. Think about how you would write this scene, if you were constructing a Psycho novelization.

Two more excellent examples are the directions of Fred Walton’s When A Stranger Calls and When A Stranger Calls Back. The pacing of the brooding horror is tortuous. You cannot help but squirm as the babysitters are unknowingly stalked by madmen. In a bad slasher movie, the opening scene to When A Stranger Calls would last a few minutes. In Fred Walton’s direction, it lasts over twenty excruciating minutes in which the viewer is trapped inside the creepy house.

The best horror authors never allow their readers to run away before the monster gets them. They lure the readers in, then they lock the doors.

As authors of horror novels, it is important we slow down and allow our readers to immerse themselves in a scene. Slower is better. Go for a gradual build, and never rush the process. Writing for horror is incredibly challenging, and it is imperative we give ourselves every advantage.

Take your time with the scene. Then scare Jessica to death.

About the Author

Dan Padavona is a horror and dark fantasy author. Dan’s gothic vampire novel, Storberry, reached the top-10 among Amazon horror novels, and his post-apocalyptic series, Dark Vanishings, has been compared to Robert McCammon’s Swan Song and Stephen King’s The Stand. You can visit Dan at his website,

Guest Post: K. Trap Jones


Finding Time to Write

K. Trap Jones


The first thing people ask me when they find out that I write is: When do you find the time?

Of course, the answer differs between writers, but for me, I write late at night. I have a full time career, a wife and three sons. I simply cannot write during the day. There are too many real life situations and the time is not there. I coach my youngest son’s soccer team and coach my middle son’s baseball team. Real life will always be more important than my writing hobby. I’ve been writing for about 6 years and have been blessed with the ability to balance my hobby with everything else.

I have a weird process with writing which reflects directly with the time. I will not write a single word until I conceive the entire story within my head. As soon as I can reach the ending, that’s when I begin writing the story. Regardless of whether it is a short story or a novel, I think through the chapters to make sure I have a complete story in mind. This helps me with the flow of writing. Every night, I am able to bust out a few thousand words or so because the story is already there and I’m not making it up as I go. With short stories, it takes me one night to write one then I use the next night to self-edit before I sub it. With novels, I find I need at least three weeks of “thinking” about the story and three additional weeks to write it down. I let it sit for a week before reading through for flow, consistency, and basic edits before sending to the publisher. It’s a crazy method, but for some odd reason, it works for me. Right now, I am currently writing my seventh novel and “thinking” about my eighth. By the time I’m done writing, I will immediately start the next.

I always thought that writing at night adds to the creepy factor of horror. When everyone else is in bed, all the lights are off and there’s music blaring in my ears… that’s where my writing begins. One Bad Fur Day was conceived over a time period of two weeks and written within three weeks. When I find the story fun to write, the process speeds up. After finishing up a night’s writing session, the next day’s chapters will be thought about during the day until the moon rises and I fire up the laptop. Since OBFD is a journey type of story, I always enjoyed thinking about the next interaction or environment Sid had to go to next in order to find the clues to his missing wife, Sally.


One Bad Fur Day


Call it odd, call it off-beat, call it fantasy; but don’t think for a moment that One Bad Fur Day is anything other than a suspense driven horror ride that blurs the lines between harsh reality and brutal imagery…

As Hurricane Katrina barrels through the Louisiana bayous, the animal population is forced to deal with the tumultuous upheaval of their world. Sheriff Sid and his wife are caught completely off-guard by the natural disaster unfolding around them as they battle not only the turbulent winds and flooding waters, but heinous acts committed by other creatures inhabiting the backwaters. Following a brutal assault on his wife, Sid is forced to fight off voodoo-priestess snakes, a junkyard raccoon, deceitful badgers, and a band of roving power-hungry alligators. While clinging to his tenuous hold as sheriff, Sid must find a way to recapture what is rightfully his and exact his revenge.

  1. Trap Jones does a fantastic job of pairing the genuine horror of a natural disaster with a story of deceit, betrayal and vengeance that pulls you in and forces the reader to identify with Sid as he journeys through the darkest reaches of the bayous, facing deadly encounters, on One Bad Fur Day!


One Bad Fur Day is available at:


Amazon: US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil | India | The Netherlands


Amazon Print: US | UK | Canada | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Brazil | India

Barnes & Noble (Print & eBook)





ABOUT THE AUTHOR – K. Trap Jones is an author of horror novels and over 50 short stories. With inspiration from Dante Alighieri and Edgar Allan Poe, he has a temptation towards narrative folklore, classic literary works and obscure segments within society.

His novel THE SINNER (Blood Bound Books) won the 2010 Royal Palm Literary Award. His splatterpunk novella, THE DRUNKEN EXORCIST has been released by Necro Publications. His narrative horror short story collection, THE CROSSROADS is available from Hazardous Press.

He is also a member of the Horror Writer’s Association and can be found lurking around Tampa, Florida.




Guest Post: Stephen Zimmer


The Soundtrack of Hellscapes, Volume II

by Stephen Zimmer



I would like to thank Armand Rosamilia for the opportunity to create a soundtrack for the six tales in Hellscapes, Volume II.  It wasn’t easy coming up with a specific list, as there are lots and lots of songs and bands that come to mind when thinking of these tales, but I have made some choices that fit very well with the individual stories.


I have broken up the synopsis, so I can give a sense of what each story is about before giving my song pick.


Hope everyone enjoys the list!  Definitely on the heavy side of things!



In “The Cavern”, a man finds his way into a nightmare, subterranean world that leads to an even greater, and more devastating, revelation.


For this one, I choose the song “Hell Awaits” by Slayer, off the album by the same name. This has all of the atmosphere that I feel in the story as well, with finality and a grand scale to things.


Lyrics such as the following fit very nicely with the roaming element contained in this particular story.



“The Reaper guard’s the darkened Gates

That Satan calls his home

Demons feed the furnace where

The Dead are free to roam”


I almost chose “South of Heaven” or “Seasons in the Abyss”, but “Hell Awaits” captures the essence and the scale of this story so wonderfully.



A police officer takes pleasure in violently executing his duties and it appears to be open season in “The Riot” when he is part of an operation sent to crack down on a gathering of people protesting an economic summit nearby. But this is an operation that is going to take a very different kind of turn, one that opens his eyes to a new reality.


For this one, I pick Pantera’s “Five Minutes Alone” off of the Far Beyond Driven album.  I’m not anti-law enforcement at all, it is a noble and needed pursuit for those who do it for the right reasons, but for the ones who abuse their power and authority I think the Pantera song fits well, especially with what transpires in this story.


It is about meting out justice in a very visceral manner that the offender cannot escape from.  Not too different from Phil Anselmo’s vision of having five minutes alone with the offender in the Pantera song.  The main character in this tale definitely is a loathsome, brutal individual who comes to face his five minutes alone with the evil he created in life.


A woman finds herself stranded on a high, rocky ledge, along with many other men and women, surrounded by a frothing sea in “Above as Below”. Shadows glide beneath the surface and soon she will discover what lurks within the depths.


For this one, I select “Monsters of the Deep” by Devildriver, off of their album The Last Kind Words.  Heavy and brooding in feel, this one definitely fits the vibe of this story.  And there definitely are monsters in the deep too!


The following lyrics are simply perfect with what transpires in this particular story:


“Set your sights on rocky shores

You just might run aground on the reef

The journey’s in the destination

Mention fear, you’re falling on deaf ears”


You’ll have to read it to find out just how, though!


“Spots Do Not Change” tells the story of a man who has never had any qualms lying, cheating, or deceiving the women in his life. A reckoning day looms as he comes to understand that his actions have harmed the lives of many others, actions that in the realms of Hell take on forms of their own.


This one gets Five Finger Death Punch’s “Meet the Monster” off of their first release, The Way of the Fist.


One line in this song speaks volumes to the theme reflected in this tale.


“It’s time you met the monster that you have helped create.”


This is a story about accountability, and about the monsters that are created when you cause others pain and harm lives.  In this story, it takes a literal form, and the one condemned does indeed meet the monster and everything else his actions gave life to.


Having spun webs of intrigue and personal destruction at the heights of national politics throughout his life, a man finds webs of another sort to present grave danger when he finds himself lost within a strange wilderness in “Weaving Webs”.


For this one I pick a rarer Danzig song, “Soul Eater”, from the release The Lost Tracks of Danzig.


With the reference to pitchforks and presidents in the song, which in my mind conjures up thoughts of the masses alongside figures of power, the following lyrics apply nicely to the main character and the ultimate fate that he comes to discover.  He has spent a lifetime in manipulation and the halls of power, but now he runs into something inescapable…that has his soul.  It also holds the connotation of someone being manipulated by a greater power, or a weaver of webs being part of an even greater web being spun.  Perfect song fit.



“Bad seed in the base of your skull

I’m here to help it grow

You wanna Pitchfork and presidents

Well, I can make you choke”

Then you call me

Here I am

But you remain

Just remember that I got your soul”


Many are drawn to “The Club” in the heart of the decaying, shadow-filled city of Malizia, hoping for some entertainment and release, or even safety from the monstrous dangers lurking in the darkness. One man struggling against amnesia finds his way to the seemingly popular establishment and its confines give him momentary hope; until he discovers the nature of this night club and those who run it.


Danzig makes the list a second time, with “Lilin” off of the Danzig 666 Satan’s Child album. This one flows with a sense of dark, supernatural power of a female nature.  With the kind of guy that the main character is, and those he comes to meet in the story, this song is a great fit.

“And if you look down into her eyes, yeah
You’ll see the souls she has trapped inside.”

Book Synopsis for Hellscapes, Volume II: Return to the nightmarish, shadowy realms of Hell in the latest installment of the Hellscapes series by Stephen Zimmer. Six brand new, macabre tales of the infernal await you … but be that you only visit these realms, you do not want to share the fates of the inhabitants you will encounter!


About the author:   Stephen Zimmer is an award-winning author and filmmaker based in Lexington Kentucky.  His work includes the cross-genre Rising Dawn Saga, the epic fantasy Fires in Eden series, the sword and sorcery Dark Sun Sawn Trilogy, featuring Rayden Valkyrie, the Harvey and Solomon Steampunk tales and the Hellscapes and Chronicles of Ave short story collections.

Author Links:














Guest Post: Jasper Bark

beyond cover insmouth



Of all the locations created by H. P. Lovecraft, none strike such an ominous a note as the ancient town of Innsmouth.


Until now, the only way to visit Innsmouth was through Lovecraft’s fiction, but thanks to an innovative crowd-funding campaign, you can actually purchase property in horror’s most legendary town. That’s right you can now buy and own a house in Innsmouth and it won’t break the bank, (though it may cost your soul).


As part of the crowd-funding campaign for the graphic novel Beyond Lovecraft, multiple award winning artist Rob Moran is building a huge scale diorama of Innsmouth, based on extensive research. As one of the campaign’s perks, Rob will build a select group of contributors a scale model of a house at one of Innsmouth’s prime locations. The house will come complete with a fully illustrated sales brochure, a deed of sale and a special letter of thanks from the town’s leading realtor.


And this is only one of the unique perks and one-of-a-kind experiences that this Indiegogo campaign is offering contributors.

pg 6

Beyond Lovecraft is a portmanteau horror story that draws directly on the work of H. P. Lovecraft. Drawn by Rob Moran, and written by award winning horror writer Jasper Bark, Beyond Lovecraft is set in the apocalyptic aftermath of the return of the great god Cthulhu. A scattered band of survivors scratch a bare living, hiding in the shadows of their lost world. A tiny group of scientist from Miskatonic university find a way to access the fabled Library of the Yith. An alien archive that contains the entire history of the universe, first mentioned in Lovecraft’s novella: The Shadow Out of Time.


The scientists hope to find a way to stop humanity’s extinction and win back their planet from the Elder Gods. Instead they uncover four tales of cosmic terror, and personal loss, that will forever change the way you view the Cthulhu mythos.


Writer Jasper Bark, says: “I think the main thing that makes our campaign stand out, is that it belongs to whoever gets involved. So many readers feel they have a personal stake in the Cthulhu mythos because, from the very beginning, Lovecraft shared his mythology with other authors as well as his readers. We want to continue this in our approach to the campaign. Every perk we’re offering, is designed to put contributors at the heart of this campaign, to give them a sense of ownership. You know when you pick up a comic and think: ‘This was made just for me!’? If you’re a Lovecraft fan, that’s how we want you to feel about ‘Beyond Lovecraft’. We’re putting it together especially for you.”


Rob adds: “Apart from being a cracker of an idea, some wonderful new twists and insights on the classic Lovecraft stories by Jasper and, all modesty aside, probably the best art of my career, I think there is a great thirst for Lovecraft to be done properly. Can you imagine Lovecraft drawn by Bernie Wrightson or Frazetta or Jesus Blasco? That’s the kind of art I want on Lovecraft stories and I think a lot of Lovecraft purists might feel the same way.”

cover 2

The Beyond Lovecraft Indiegogo Campaign starts on 10/5/2015 and can be found here:

For images and other promotional materials please contact Jasper Bark @

Guest Post: Jerry Benns

jerry pic

Author Jerry Benns Makes Debut in Paying the Ferryman

The Ferryman has arrived and brought some amazing stories from the afterlife. One of these stories, from the new anthology Paying the Ferryman, is from an author making his debut—Jerry E. Benns. As founder of Charon Coin Press and editor of the State of Horror series, Jerry has been busy getting great stories into the hands of horror fans. He takes the mission of Charon Coin seriously, “to produce quality works of speculative fiction with the readers in mind by creating a connection, a relationship if you will, with these fantastic authors” and he has worked tirelessly to uphold that mission. He started off as a book aficionado, his love of all things books led him into publishing and he was a consummate blogger at Trip Through My

Giving Back

Taking the time to run a publishing company left precious little time for his own writing. To date he has produced five books in the State of Horror series with another, State of Horror: Tennessee, due for release by the end of this year. In addition to his work on State of Horror, Benns has several other projects in the works set for release in the next year. And on top of that he does many activities to benefit not only the writing community, but society at large. He participates in cycling and running events to raise funds and awareness for diabetes, lupus, heart disease, firefighters and many others. However, now Jerry Benns has found the time to take his next step as an author with his first short story “The Mai’tas Prophecy” in Paying the Ferryman.

First Published Story

“The Mai’tas Prophecy” is an imaginative story set in New Orleans. Benns was able to weave the unique feel and culture of New Orleans with something the locals live everyday—the spirit plane. What better place to set an alternate plane than in New Orleans? Jerry Benns is a natural storyteller, which shows as you step into the world he creates. The fact that the characters are all dead is of no consequence because you are driven to find out what will happen next. His take on death-is-not-the-worst-thing-that-can-happen-to-you, takes on a whole new meaning as the story unfolds.  It is hard to believe that this story is Jerry Benns’ first published story because he tells stories like a seasoned veteran and we can only hope this story is the first of much more to come.

About Paying the Ferryman

Benns’ “The Mai’tas Prophecy” joins nineteen other fantastic stories in Paying the Ferryman—an anthology in which the main character is already dead and then the story begins. That’s right, stories brought to you from the Ferryman himself from the other side. Along with Jerry Benns, four other talented newcomers share thrilling tales from the afterlife in Paying the Ferryman. Their stories are nestled between such seasoned authors as Armand Rosamilia, Brian Fatah Steele, Diane Arrelle, and S.H. Roddey just to name a few. Acclaimed author Hal Bodner lent his voice to the Foreword making Paying the Ferryman an incredible collection of stories in which death is just the beginning.


 Paying the Ferryman is available now at:

Amazon Link shortened:

            iTunes link:

            Kobo link:

            Nook link:

Paying the Ferryman is an anthology with something for everyone. For horror fans, it is a must read, for those seeking a thrill, you will find it, need a little rock and roll vibe—it’s in here, want suspense—it can be found in these pages, even those seeking a philosophical slant will find what they seek in Paying the Ferryman, but be sure not to miss Jerry Benns “The Mai’tas Prophecy” it will haunt you.

Armand’s Horror Movie Survival Kit


First, I want to thank Man Crates for coming up with this idea and getting my creative juices flowing.It’s a very cool site that packages perfect gift crates for us dudes, pairing booze and man food and other awesome stuff. They even have a zombie survival crate. Seriously, if you’re looking for a great gift for my upcoming birthday (November 21st – add it to your calendar!) or Christmas, you can’t go wrong with this.

Now, what would I have in my horror survival kit? Like you and everyone else who has eyes and can breathe, I watched way too many horror movies as a kid. Even as an adult, when I am more prone to a Jennifer Aniston rom-com, I still think back fondly to some of my favorite horror movies and wonder what I would’ve done differently. I figured it out.

Here are the items I would need in my horror movie survival kit in order to survive until the end:


  1. A cricket bat. I had one in my twenties when I managed bands. It was a very lame Spinal Tap joke but the damn thing came in handy a few times when someone crossed me. The one I had used to have some dried blood on it, which was cool. It also worked as a makeshift table before I got furniture in my bachelor pad, too.
  2. A few books. I’m not going to mention mine (which you can purchase Here) but some classic literature for the many hours of downtime between monster attacks would be nice. Maybe some light-hearted reading like Lovecraft, Koontz, Laymon, etc.
  3. Jean shorts. So I can be comfortable. Add a black t-shirt and you have the perfect running away from monsters outfit.
  4. Jack Daniels Honey. Just the small bottle so I can stay kinda sober throughout the ordeal. I don;t want to be too drunk but stone cold sober with a knife-wielding maniac loose isn’t fun, either.
  5. M&M’s. At least a pound of plain and peanut. Because if I’m going to die (and I will die) I want to be eating M&M’s when i do.


What does your list look like?


Horror 201: The Silver Scream Vol. 1 Now Available!

horror 201 volume 1 small

The definitive guide to filmmaking and filmmakers by the best in the field


Horror 201: The Silver Scream, the follow-up to the Bram Stoker Award nominated Horror 101: The Way Forward, delves into the minds of filmmakers to see what it takes to produce great horror films, from the writing and funding process, to directing, producing, and writing tie-ins.


It’s a tome of interviews and essays by some of our favorite artists.


That’s right, film legends and authors such as Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Ray Bradbury, Ed Naha, Patrick Lussier, Stephen Volk, Nancy Holder, Tom Holland, John Shirley, William Stout, and John Russo want to share their expertise with you through informative, practical, career-building advice.


These are the folks behind movies and novelizations such as A Nightmare on Elm Street, Scream, Dark Shadows, Sleepy Hollow, Supernatural, Buffy, Resident Evil, The Stand, Sleepwalkers, Masters of Horror, The Fly, Critters, Tales from the Crypt, Child’s Play, Fright Night, Thinner, The Langoliers, Ted Bundy, Re-animator Unbound, Halloween, Apollo 18, The Eye, Night of the Living Dead, The Crow, The Mist, Pan’s Labyrinth, and Raiders of the Lost Ark.


Horror 201 also entertains. You’ll see a side of your favorite authors, producers, and directors never seen before – combining fun and entertainment with informative career-building advice.


Horror 201 is aimed at arming generations of authors, screenwriters, producers, directors, and anyone else interested in the film industry, from big budget movies to the independent film circuit, as well as the stage.


Whether you’re an accomplished author or screenwriter, writing as a hobby, or have dreams of writing screenplays or making movies, Horror 201 will take you on a behind the scenes tour of the Horror movie industry from Hollywood to the UK and Australia.


Horror 201 covers:

  • Horror as culture
  • Scare tactics
  • The evolution of the horror film
  • Viewer desensitization
  • Watching your story come to life
  • Screenwriting advice
  • Dissecting screenplays
  • A production company case study
  • Tricks of the trade
  • Writing tips
  • Advice on Producing
  • Advice on Directing
  • Information about funding and distributing a film
  • Entertaining tidbits and anecdotes


And so much more!


Horror 201: The Silver Scream is perfect for people who:

  • are looking to delve into screenplay writing
  • want to write their first screenplay
  • are fans of the horror movie industry
  • like to follow the careers of their favorite directors
  • are planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing
  • are looking to pay more bills with their art
  • are trying to establish a name brand
  • are looking to get published
  • are looking for motivation and/or inspiration
  • are seeking contacts in the film industry


Edited by Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley.


The full line-up includes:

Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Ray Bradbury, Ramsey Campbell, Ed Naha, Edward Lee, Patrick Lussier, Tim Lebbon, Jonathan Maberry, Stephen Volk, William Stout, Michael McCarty, Dan Curtis, William Stout, Graham Masterton, Harry Shannon, Jason V. Brock, L.L. Soares, Mick Garris, William F. Nolan, Lee Karr, Stephen Johnston, Aaron Sterns, Michael Laimo, Jonathan Winn, David. C. Hayes, Brian Pinkerton, David Henson Greathouse, Aaron Dries, Armand Rosamilia, Billy Hanson, Jack Thomas Smith, John Russo, Mark Steensland, John Shirley, Tom Holland, Adrian Roe, Dave Jeffery, James Hart, James Cullen Bressack, Jeff Strand, Nancy Holder, E.C. McMullen Jr., Richard Gray, Richard Chizmar, William C. Cope (interior artist), Tim Waggoner, Tom Monteleone, Nick Cato, Kevin Wetmore, Eric Miller, and Lynne Hansen.


Don’t let this opportunity slip through your creative fingers.


“Being a part of Horror 201: The Silver Scream is almost as thrilling as having had my novels turned into feature films. After all, it’s not everyday one shares a TOC with George Romero, Wes Craven, and Mick Garris! This is a must have book for all writers looking to break into filmmaking.” – Michael Laimo




“No one teaches horror. As a student of terror, realizing just how useful it is in teaching how society works and is influenced, that is a shame. Horror 201 opens the door again, but be careful… you don’t know what lurks on the other side. The truth is scary.” – David C. Hayes




“With essays and interviews from the likes of John Carpenter, Richard Chizmar, Dan Curtis, Harry Shannon, Edward Lee and the late great Wes Craven, HORROR 201: THE SILVER SCREAM serves up prime cuts of fresh meat and raw broken bone for the palate of the discerning horror fiction and flick aficionado.” – Steve Vernon (author of Tatterdemon)




“As an in-depth look into what it takes to produce great horror films, we can think of no better resource on the market!” – Dave Jeffery & James Hart ( Award winning film makers from Venomous Little Man Productions)




“Horror 201: The Silver Scream will be seen as a landmark, the ultimate practical guide to horror filmmaking that will hopefully create and arm an entire generation of horror screenwriters and aspiring directors.” – Aaron Sterns




“Horror 201: The Silver Scream Vol.1 is chock-full of advice from many different artists associated with the movie industry. Tips on everything you need to know about the biz are included here: articles, history, music, screen writing, tricks of the trade, cultural and historic fears. They’re all here. And much more. There is never a one-fits all solution for anything, but this great tome will point you in the right direction. Crystal Lake Publishing is fast becoming the expert on all things horror.” – Blaze McRob



“A treasure of insights, anecdotes, and advice on the art and craft of horror films—from those who are in the trenches doing it. A must-read for fans and future filmmakers alike.” – Taylor Grant, Award-Winning Filmmaker, The Muse, Sticks & Stones, The Vanished




“The brilliance of Horror 201: The Silver Scream is how easily it blends the solid experience and unquestioned genius of experts like Wes Craven, George A. Romero and Ray Bradbury with the eager musings and possibly incoherent ramblings of relative newbies like me. Instead of a work penned solely by experts, we have instead a democratic microcosm of the industry. So for those who’ve often wondered how to bridge the divide between horror and Hollywood, they’re sure to find something — no matter how familiar they are with the ins-and-outs of the business — that speaks to them, answers their questions, and hopefully inspires them to take their next step. All in all, a fantastic read, a strong addition to an already famous series, and a great honor to be a part of.”  — Jonathan Winn, Martuk … the Holy, Eidolon Avenue (Crystal Lake Publishing, Jan 2016)




“Horror 201: The Silver Scream, a quasi-follow-up to Horror 101: The Way Forward, focuses squarely on the horror film industry. And similar to Horror 101, which deals with the art of writing horror, Horror 201 is a veritable grab bag of industry insiders’ encouragement and advice. You can dip in anywhere and discover pure gold and an unrestrained affection for the genre, although Joe Mynhardt has sensibly grouped the material he has garnered into logical sections such as ‘Screenwriting’ and ‘Novelisations’. Quite how he has managed it, I don’t know, but you will find here a proper treasure trove of goodies, including essays such as Scare Tactics: The Evolution of the Horror Film & Viewer DesensitisationHorror is Culture, and a tribute to Wes Craven, and interviews with John Carpenter, George A. Romero, and Wes Craven among others. An absolute must for fans of horror films and those who want to write, produce, or direct in the genre.” – John Kenny




“Horror 201 The Silver Scream is an eye-opening walkthrough in the wonderful world of filmmaking! This is perfect for the upcoming screenplay writer, film director, and everybody who loves a good horror movie! These pages hold essays, interviews, and endless knowledge for those looking to open their eyes and expand into this amazing craft. This isn’t just a book, it’s a gateway. A gateway to a vast universe hidden backstage with all the ins and outs, tips, tricks, and trades of the craft!” – Kya Aliana, author of the Vampiress series




“Horror 201: The Silver Scream is a milestone in horror history and filmmaking history. This invaluable collection will take you far and deep, thrusting you into the inside world of horror movies! Consider this book a beacon, calling out to you, guiding you through your craft and showing you the best way to go.” – Kya Aliana, author of the Vampiress series




“If you’ve ever wanted to go back stage or behind the scenes, now you do it from the comfort your couch, bed, or favorite lounge chair! Horror 201 brings an exciting aspect to world of horror – the ability to learn from the pros! This is a turning point in horror and film history, and will certainly continue to inspire, teach, and guide everyone who is involved in the industry!” – Kya Aliana, author of the Vampiress series