#WinterofZombie is Coming…


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This is more or less a teaser for ya…

Once again, November will be Winter of Zombie blog tour time and this year I am opening it up to not only the great zombie authors I’ve worked with in the past, but the new ones as well!

Starting September 1st (or around there) I will begin accepting zombie authors onto the list who are interested in participating in the event. A few things you need to know before you send me a message in September, though:

1. You have to have RELEASED a Zombie book. Seems common sense, but…

2. Your Zombie release has to be out before October 15th so I can get all the material for it well ahead of time. Unfortunately, I will no longer accept authors promoting books being released in November or beyond, since it’s (quite frankly) a pain in the ass to update posts, especially when you’re talking 150+ posts I put together for the month. You need to have everything ready to go as soon as I ask for it. 

3. You’ll be expected to do a Spotlight On interview, 2 (or more) Guest Posts and a teaser for your Zombie release. You’re also expected to share all of the other posts each day and spread the word. 

4. The goal is only 35 Zombie authors, and we had three times that many not able to get in during the Summer of Zombie event, so this will be a First Come First Served type of deal. I make ALL decisions and if you’ve been on previous tours you know I don’t take kindly to slackers and those who only promote themselves (those people won’t be on the tour again)

5. Got it? September 1st send me an e-mail to  armandrosamilia@gmail.com with WINTER OF ZOMBIE in the subject line and any questions you have and tell me you want in. I’ll begin putting the list together and asking for material asap. I create a secret group for the authors involved and all the info will be there, too. Deadline will be October 15th for all material to be in. Gives you plenty of time if accepted. NO EXCEPTIONS this year, either. You’re either 100% in or you’re not. 

6. The actual event page (where all the actual posts will go and people can join and read all of them) is now live ahead of time at WINTER OF ZOMBIE on Facebook. Join it and feel free to add all of your fans and friends, too! 

Armand Rosamilia

#WinterofZombie

Guest Post: Roger Jackson


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The Song of the Counter-Intuitive

By

Roger Jackson

Every writer has their quirks, I think. Whether it be a constant supply of coffee chuckling blackly to itself beside them, or a place where the sunlight is perfect, or even, as Annie Wilkes suggests in Misery, a pair of handmade writing slippers, every writer has a gimmick of their own, perhaps even the smallest talisman or routine that greases the wheels of the writing process. A lot of writers need peace and quiet, absolute silence when they create, but it’s fair to say that most authors I’ve spoken to listen to music when they write, perhaps with the volume cranked up to its apex, rattling the kitchenware like a poltergeist, perhaps with their ears couched in the intimate embrace of an isolating pair of headphones. They listen to what they like, what relaxes them. They listen to what their characters like, or the music that’s playing in a particular scene. They listen to movie soundtracks, something that fits or sets the mood of the moments they’re creating.

I’ve done that, and sometimes it works, but I’ve found something else that works, too. Ones instinct is to listen to music that’s appropriate for a scene, the driving beats of a chase or a struggle, the sweeping strings of a romantic interlude. That works, but I’ve also found it useful to take a different approach, to think counter-intuitively about what music might accompany certain given moments.

To offer an example. I’ve a scene in a novel I’ve written where a character is confronted by a horribly twisted version of a deceased family member. Let’s give this character the entirely fake name of Steve, just in case the novel is ever sold, and someone reading this reads the novel and is like, “Hey, I know what happens in this part! Spoilers! This novel is DEAD to me!” (how’s that for writerly optimism?). Anyways, Steve is trapped with this apparition, and I’ve paced the scene very quickly, nice and terse, lots of breathless paragraphs as Steve’s scared companion tries to break into the room in which he’s trapped with something monstrous.

And it is monstrous. Like most Horror writers, I’m pretty proud of my twisted track record, proud of any moments I’ve written that have touched the reader with fear or disgust or dread. I’d like to think I’ve done a few of those, but this scene … it’s dark. It’s the darkest thing I’ve ever written, maybe. Hopefully, there’s a raw, visceral quality to it that’ll unsettle. There’s imagery, yes, but I don’t think that’s where the Horror comes from. I don’t think it comes from how the monster moves, or what it’s saying, or the terrible transformation that the dead family member seems to have undergone. I think the Horror of that particular moment comes from how heartbreaking it is for Steve to see what’s happened to someone so well-loved, so very missed. He’s terrified, yes, but if we’re playing a kind of psychological rock-paper-scissors game here, then in this instance heartbreak vanquishes terror, hands down.

And so the Horror is borne not from what Steve can see, but what he can feel, and what he feels is a terrible, empty grief, a moment that needs not a soundtrack of action, where there’s an apparition advancing and a concerned companion trying to break in fast enough to rescue him, but a sadder tune, one that reflects the core of the scene. That was the kind of music I listened to when I wrote it, and it seemed to give the sequence the tone that it needed.

I’d suggest giving it a try. Maybe you’re writing something and the words are flowing but the mood of the scene, the beating heart of it, is stuttering on the page. It might be because the coffee is cold, or the sunlight is fading, or even that your handmade writing slippers are pinching your toes, but it might be that your chosen music isn’t oiling the cogs of your imagination like it should.

It might be that you, and the moment your characters find themselves in, need a different song.

 

 

 

Roger Jackson lives in the United Kingdom, drinking tea and owning more Geeky tee-shirts than he will ever live long enough to wear, unless he lives forever, which is sort of the plan. He writes scary stories because he has to, and the most recent to scramble from the graveyard of his brain are the short story, “No-Man’s Land” in the Grey Matter Press anthology Equilibrium Overturned, and his novella, “Cradle Of The Dead” from BloodBound Books. Writing about himself in the third person really creeps him out.

 

Twitter: @jabe842

Blog: jabe842.wordpress.com

Guest Post: Kevin Bond


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Why You Should Carry A Rock in the Zombie Apocalypse

We’ve all seen the meme: “Quick! The first thing on your left is your weapon in the zombie apocalypse! What is it?”

It always ends up being a paperclip, a coffee cup, or a guitar pick, and unless you’re Riddick, none of those are going to be useful for killing zombies.

Of course, a kitchen knife isn’t far away, and you’ve probably got a baseball bat in the garage. Those of us who are more prepared may have an arsenal for backup, gun enthusiasts and knife collectors. You might even have a detailed plan for how to survive the zombie apocalypse.

I’m going to propose a different line of thinking, though, and I guarantee you’ve never thought of it before:

You should carry a rock in the zombie apocalypse.

Not a boulder, not a rock the size of a soccer ball. Just a simple stone that will fit into the palm of your hand. And it’s not a big deal if you lose this stone. It’s very easy to find a new one.

Why?

Because it will save your life.

You can carry a rock in the palm of your hand, out of sight, and it becomes a projectile weapon. You’ll need to train yourself to aim well, so throw a lot.

You could throw a knife too, but a knife is not necessarily expendable, and it’s harder to throw a knife straight than it is to throw a rock. And again, rocks are easy to find.

If you don’t have a spring-assisted knife or a straight blade in your hand already, then if you get a sudden surprise, you may not have enough time to get your knife out and ready. Holding on to a small stone means that you have an instant weapon for instant surprises, like zombies, or thieves.

A stone is much more dense than your hands, so bashing someone’s face in with it will do much more damage than you could do with your hands.

Plus, if you find yourself in a sudden end of the world situation, and you haven’t prepared for it, you may not have a weapon. Having a rock will give you something hard to hit with.

Thousands of years ago, it was common for people to be killed by stoning them. The blunt force trauma from multiple rock projectiles was enough to do major damage to a person.

You don’t need to have fancy weapons to kill someone if you have to. Carrying a rock can provide you with an easy way to distract a zombie or a person who wants to kill you or wants your stuff.
Even if you’re not under a sudden attack, it’s not noticeable that you’re holding something (go for a thinner, smooth rock), so as long as you have good aim, throwing it at the person should give you enough time to escape.

I guarantee this will work, because no one is thinking like this. Throwing rocks at people is just so unheard of.

Remember when you were a little kid and you were throwing rocks at other kids on the playground? No? Well then, I guess I was the weirdo. Anyway, your mom scolded you, and it’s kind of ingrained in your head not to throw things at people.

No one is going to suspect that you’re prepared to throw a rock at them. Practice throwing, and your impact will send them a very clear message.

There may be times when you don’t want to escape, but instead want to steal whatever that person has (remember, it’s the end of days, and just about anything goes) before they steal from you and leave you for dead. In that case, hitting them with that rock will hurt and distract them long enough for you to close in for the kill.

In case you run into a group of scavengers, though, your best bet is to run and live to fight another day.

For zombies, it doesn’t matter if that rock hurts them, because it won’t kill them, and it won’t send them down to the ground unless you throw a really mean rock. The distraction is what you’re after. Hit them to slow them down so you have enough time to grab your zombie-killing weapon, or to give yourself enough time to run past them.

For multiple zombies, throwing a rock won’t work. For groups of zombies I recommend just hightailing it out of there.

You can also use a rock as a noise distraction, for zombies or people. Use it to trick your pursuers into following the sound, or to distract them from your sneak attack!

I hope I’ve convinced you to add a rock to your arsenal of zombie weapons. It’s an easy item to get, and it has a couple of good uses in certain situations. Give yourself this edge against your enemies, and happy surviving!

 

About Kevin: Kevin Bond is the author of HelpZombies.com, a zombie-themed survivalist website. It is expanding to include makeup tutorials, survival guides, product reviews, and even a zombie shop!

Guest Post: John L. Davis IV


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“Horrors” How I See It
 
            Something dark, slimy, gruesome crawls from below, sharp white teeth bared and ready to snap closed on an unsuspecting victim.  Those teeth will easily shred flesh; the jaws can crack bone, disturbingly sexual fleshy red lips seal around jagged shards of bone and draw out the marrow. 
            This nightmare beast isn’t something from a new horror movie, or a recent novel, it’s that thing inside the reader, that creature reveling in the dark tales of horror.  It’s one side of the bloody coin of fear we readers trade in when delving into a novel of terror. 
            The other side is the cowering thing, the one hiding from the beast, afraid of the darkness, afraid of the words. 
            When reading that truly terrifying novel and you find yourself turning on every light in the house, or pulling your feet up over the edge of the bed, that’s the cowering thing that has to draw away, to hide in the light.
            But you keep reading, crawling ever deeper into the dark pit, searching out that next thing to terrify. 
            It is in the center of this duality that the reader and writer of horror can most closely examine the human condition and in far more depth, I believe, than any other genre. 
            In horror fiction the fluff of niceties is often blown away by a throat-ripping scream.  Pomp is hacked to pieces like two horny teenagers in a backwoods cabin.  You’re left with bleak and nearly hopeless circumstance.
            In that circumstance are the dark things and the light things that make us who we are and both can be difficult to look at head on, but when you read about that zombie shuffling toward the now-weaponless hero backed into a corner with nowhere to go, in that moment you are both the zombie and the hero.  The dark and the light.
            Here the beast delights, savoring the scent of fear exuded by the small thing that hides, turns away, curling toes up beneath the covers.  Then that moment has passed, and the reader moves on.
            The cowering creature reads on in hopes that the hero wins, and it can come out of hiding.  The creature lurking in dread waits silently for the next flash of panic to leap out, claws slashing, hoping to tear something away.
            This is horror the way I see it. 
Ever since I first read Dean Koontz’ “Phantoms”, or Stephen King’s “The Shining” I’ve had a  dark love affair with every nightmare inducing permutation of horror literature.  From the splatterpunk ravings of John Skip and Craig Spector, to Shirley Jackson’s dark and brooding “We Have Always Lived in the Castle,” to the twisted brilliance of Lovecraft and Poe, I have been darkled by things that claw at the imagination.
Horror, to me, is the one form of literature that shines a blacklight on humanity, revealing those things normally not seen. Then the blades or claws come out, slashing at our perceptions, permitting the reader to view the world with the flesh peeled away, the glistening redness beneath exposing the reality of all that we are and can be, both beast and simpering coward and all that lies between.
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John L. Davis, IV is an avid reader who enjoys adding to his ever-expanding home library and talking books with pretty much anyone at any time. John lives in Hannibal, MO, with his books, his wife — Erica, daughters — Astrid and Hannah, and their much-loved pooch — Pixie. He loves to hear from his readers, so stop by and converse about life, love, and the pursuit of zombies.  He is the author of the American Revenant series, available at Amazon.com
Americanrevenantseries.com

Guest Post: Loren Rhoads


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Twenty years ago, Imperial assassin Raena Zacari was court-martialed, entombed alive, and left for dead.  While she was imprisoned, the human empire she served unleashed a genocidal plague that wiped out the Templars.  In retaliation, the other peoples of the galaxy banded together to obliterate the Empire. The Human-Templar War is over finally, but humanity remains scattered and reviled.

 

Gavin Sloane has been hunting desperately for Raena since he lost her after a failed rescue attempt during the War.  He’s sunken to robbing Templar tombs as a way to fund his search. He never was a nice man. Looking for Raena has driven him over the edge.

 

Raena’s adopted sister Ariel Shaad made a fortune smuggling guns to the human-and-alien Coalition during the War.  She sent Gavin on his mad quest to find Raena in the first place.  She would do anything to help her sister, but money can’t make everything right.

 

Once Raena is freed, the insane war criminal who enslaved her and trained her to kill wants her back. Jonan Thallian is willing to risk everything – including his army of cloned sons – to bring her back under his control. Now it’s a race to see who kills whom first.

 

The Dangerous Type mixes action SF with adventurous space opera that grabs you from the first pages and doesn’t let go. Along with a supporting cast of smugglers, black market doctors, and other ne’er-do-wells sprawled across a galaxy brimming with alien life, The Dangerous Type has been described as La Femme Nikita meets Firefly.

 

The Dangerous Type is only the first book in Loren Rhoads’s epic trilogy, which continues with Kill By Numbers and No More Heroes.  All three books will be published by Night Shade in 2015.

 

An excerpt from Chapter 1:

 

Most of the tombs they’d entered had warehoused whole companies of bugs, the dead warriors of a single starship buried together.  Kavanaugh played his light around the inside this cavern but found only a single catafalque, an uncarved slab of obsidian in the rough center of the room.  Whoever lay atop it must be important, he thought.  Shouldn’t take too long to loot one body.  Maybe there would actually be something worth stealing this time.

 

Kavanaugh peeled off his face shield and lifted the flask, sucking down the last half of its contents as the men converged on the catafalque. “What’s a human girl doing in here?” Taki asked.

 

Curcovic teased, “Maybe you can wake her with a kiss.”

 

“ ’Cept for the dust,” Lim commented.

 

“Well, yeah, ’cept for the dust, Lim.  Damn, man, don’t you have any imagination?”

 

“Just what did you have in mind?” Lim asked skeptically.

 

“Are you sure she’s human?” Kavanaugh asked as he slipped the flask back inside his coat.

 

“I think she’s just a kid,” Curcovic added.  “No armor.  You think she was somebody important’s kid?”

 

“She’s the best thing I’ve seen on this rock so far,” Taki pointed out.  His hand wiped some of the dust from her chest.

 

Kavanaugh was crossing the uneven floor to join them when a low female voice said clearly, “No.”

 

Curcovic stumbled backward, dropping his torch and fumbling at the gun at his hip.  The corpse sat up, straight-arming her fist into Taki’s face.  Stunned, he cracked his head on the stone floor when he went down. He lay still at the foot of the catafalque.

 

Lim backed away, light trained on the figure rising in the middle of the tomb.  It was hard for Kavanaugh to make her out in the unsteady light:  a slip of a girl dressed in gray with a cloak of dusty black hair that fell past her knees.

 

Curcovic finally succeeded in drawing his gun.  The girl darted sideways faster than Kavanaugh could follow in the half-light.  A red bolt flashed out, blinding in the darkness.  Lim collapsed to the floor, cursing Curcovic.

 

The girl rounded on Curcovic, turning a one-handed cartwheel that left her in range to kick the gun from his hand.  She twisted around, nearly too quick to see, and cracked her fist hard into his chest.  Curcovic fell as if poleaxed.  Lim groaned from the floor, hands clasped over his belly.

 

None of the men were dead yet, Kavanaugh noticed.  She could have killed them as if they’d been standing still, but she’d disabled them instead.  He suspected that was because they posed no real threat to her.  Maybe she needed them alive.  He hoped that was true.

 

Cold sweat ran into Kavanaugh’s eyes.  He held the flask in his gun hand.  He’d have to drop it to draw his weapon.  If the noise caught her attention, he’d be headed for the ground before his gun barrel cleared his holster.

Loren Rhoads photo

Loren Rhoads is the author of The Dangerous Type, Kill By Numbers, and No More Heroes, the In the Wake of the Templars trilogy.  She’s the co-author of As Above, So Below with Brian Thomas. She authored Wish You Were Here: Adventures in Cemetery Travels and edited The Haunted Mansion Project: Year Two and Morbid Curiosity Cures the Blues. She’s been an active member of the Horror Writers Association since 2001.

 

The book’s home page:  http://lorenrhoads.com/writing/the-dangerous-type/

Amazon: http://amzn.to/1LT1V31

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-dangerous-type-loren-rhoads/1121330783?ean=9781597808149

Loren on Facebook: www.facebook.com/loren.rhoads.5

Loren on Twitter: http://twitter.com/morbidloren

Loren’s blog:  http://lorenrhoads.com/blog

Reblog: Armand Rosamilia Interview with Rudes review


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Armand Rosamilia, author of the Dying Days zombie series, is interviewed: 

http://www.renereviews.com/interview-with-author-armand-rosamilia/

Advertising on Arm Cast Podcast and Arm N Toof: Dead Time Podcast


Since the switch of Arm Cast: Dead Sexy Horror Podcast to Project iRadio listenership has soared. I went from a decent amount of loyal listeners so many, many new ones and I couldn’t be happier.

I’m also excited to be one-half of the team for an upcoming second podcast on Project iRadio, Arm N Toof: Dead Time Podcast with author Mark Tufo.

Jess at Project iRadio (along with author Brian Keene) will be taking advertising for each show. We’ll either be reading spots inside the show itself or adding your radio-ready spots to the episode. Get in touch with them for what you need to do. There are many podcasts attached to Project iRadio besides these two new ones, so you can also advertise on multiple ones if you want. Just sayin’.

Interested in seeing what the rates are? Go HERE for all of the information and to ask for more info, too. Let them know I recommended you, please and thank you.

Most shows will only have up to three ads per episode, so space is very limited. Act now. Don’t delay.

Hopefully Mark Tufo and I will be reading your ad on a future episode!

ARM CAST: DEAD SEXY HORROR PODCAST

Podcast devoted to interviewing horror authors, publishers, editors, artists, filmmakers, narrators, and anyone else in the arts and entertainment fields. We also like M&Ms. Armand Rosamilia is your host.

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ARM N TOOF’S DEAD TIME PODCAST

Two hosts for the price of one. Authors Armand Rosamilia and Mark Tufo interview authors, publishers, filmmakers and anyone else they want to chat with. Not only zombie and apocalyptic peeps, either… literally anyone they want to talk to. Coming Wednesday July 8th to Project iRadio.

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