Suspended In Dusk Anthology – Table of Contents Reveal


Armand Rosamilia:

On my second round of edits for my tale. The ToC for this is amazing!

Originally posted on SIMON DEWAR:

Hi everyone,

It’s been a while since  I’ve had a chance to post. Work has been flat out, my beautiful wife is pregnant with twins that are due mid-June and I’ve been buried deep in the second round of edits for the Suspended in Dusk anthology.

Because of all these hectic goings-on, I’ve neglected to give you all a teaser about Suspended in Dusk, so here I am to remedy that.

Here is the (unordered) Table of Contents for the anthology; a fantastic list of authors and a fantastic line up of stories.

Alan Baxter – Shadows of the Lonely Dead
Angela Slatter – The Way of All Flesh
Anna Reith – Taming the Stars
Armand Rosamilia – At Dusk They Come
Benjamin Knox – The Keeper of Secrets
Brett Rex Bruton – Outside In
Chris Limb – Ministry of Outrage
Icy Sedgwick – A Woman of Disrepute
J C Michael

View original 139 more words

About these ads

Guest Post: Alyssa Cooper


alyssa2

The Motel Room, a modern twist on the classic ghost story. Only $0.99!

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JHV0U9E

 

Since his death, our Narrator has been trapped in a motel room, watching the comings and goings of his nightly guests. The strangers never stay more than a night or two, and they never pay him any mind. Then one morning, a maid turns her head and the two lock eyes – the first time he has been seen since his death. Only then does he begin to discover the true power behind his ghostly form.

 Alyssa1

Alyssa Cooper was first published at the age of eighteen, and is the author of three traditionally published books, Salvation, Benjamin, and Cold Breath of Life. The Motel Room is her first foray into the wide world of self publishing. Look for her second self published title, Whispering Peak, coming soon!

http://alyssacooper.ca/

Guest Post: Gary R. Eddings


Gary Eddings

Excerpt from Hollow Point by Gary R. Eddings:

 

It is told that a Great Serpent caused extreme distress and threatened the Salish people. Chief Kitsap called down the Double-Headed Eagle from the mountains to fight it. The two creatures engaged in a horrible battle and the Great Serpent eventually pulled the Eagle down, presumably to his death, plowing a huge trench that filled with water and became Agate Pass, separating the Kitsap Peninsula from Bainbridge Island.

The people mourned. Then the ground shook and the Double-Headed Eagle rose from the water in victory, having killed the Great Serpent. To this day the symbol of the Suquamish is the Double-Headed Eagle, their protector.

That type of power is needed once again for the Tribe.

Hollow Point

Title:  Hollow Point

Author:  Gary R. Eddings

Published:  January 2014

Publisher:  Champagne Book Group

Word Count:  60,000

Genre:  Suspense, Thriller

Recommended Age:  13+

Synopsis: There is no such thing as an ordinary traffic stop, something Tribal Officer Pat Colson is reminded of when pulling over a dusty old Buick. Before he knows it, shots are flying and he is huddled behind his police cruiser for cover.

In the ensuring investigation, a sizable amount of methamphetamine is discovered in the suspects’ vehicle. Uncut and very potent, the question is where does it come from— the Reservation or elsewhere?

With everyone on the Reservation becoming a suspect, and little information to go on, Colson must act fast to stop the dangerous drug from killing more innocent victims and stop a murderer in his tracks.

Amazon | GoodReads

 

About the Author:

I retired as a fire department EMS Division Chief for Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue in 2005. I have been writing seriously since mid-2009, and this is my second novel with Champagne Book Group. I am also a member of the Pacific Northwest Writers Association. I am the father of four and the grandfather of three; a two year old grandson and newly-minted twin girls.

Amazon Author Page | Facebook | Twitter | GoodReads | Website

Writing: The Pregnant Pause and Slacking to Win


Armand Rosamilia:

Wise words of wonderful wisdom from Robert Chazz Chute

Originally posted on C h a z z W r i t e s . c o m:

One thing about being an indie author that nobody ever seems to say is, relax and stop running from time to time.

Sometimes, the Internet seems like it’s all about motion. We push books and try to pull people in. We follow endlessly and sometimes joylessly. It should be fun to meet new people and find out about what’s new and cool. But everybody needs a break, if it’s at the right time.

I’ve found the right time.

You haven’t seen me lately, unless you checked out my review of Transcendence at AllThatChazz.com or my article on food and emotion at DecisionToChange.com. After doing a major promotion for my crime novel, Bigger Than Jesus, I felt it was time to step back. I’m still busy, but sometimes it makes a lot of sense to get out of your followers faces for a bit. Give your tribe some time…

View original 634 more words

Name My Podcast


sendung

Within the next few weeks I’ll be embarking on my latest foray… a podcast, which will be about my own writing career as well as bringing in a new co-host each week to talk about anything they want when it comes to their writing, the scene and whatever else we want to talk about. 

But I need a good name for it. This is where you come in. Simply vote on the names on the poll or choose your own suggestion and let me know what you think. The winner will get some snazzy swag from me… and if more than one person voted on the winning answer in the poll I’ll treat a couple/three people to the winning stuff… Voting ends in a couple of weeks, so hurry up and let me know what you’re thinking! 

Thoughts on WHC 2014


Armand Rosamilia:

I’ll see Carl Moore at this year’s WHC and finally officially meet him!

Originally posted on The Crimes of Heaven and Hell:

Further to announcing I will be attending World Horror Convention this year, I thought I would add a short blog entry. The last WHC I attended was in 2008, in Salt Lake City, Utah. At that time I was totally new to the genre and just beginning to meet people. I attended the Bram Stoker Awards and various panels and parties and started to get a sense of the who’s-who among authors and publishers.

Between the last conference and this one I’ve published several short stories, a novella, and made connections with many new authors, editors and publishers. I’m looking forward now to reacquainting folks with whom it’s been too long, as well as finally meeting in person, folks with whom I’ve only interacted online—people like Ross Lockhart, Armand Rosamilia, Sydney Leigh to name a few, as well as perhaps getting to attend panels, hear readings with some…

View original 299 more words

Guest Post: Joyce Proell


Joyce Proell

Three things I learned while writing A BURNING TRUTH

 

  1. Be Certain of Your Facts. Recently I read a novel where the main character fled an assailant along Lake Shore Drive in Chicago just north of the Loop. Anyone familiar with the area knows it’s a street with tall skyscrapers, not suburban houses with fenced-in yards and gardens as depicted in the scene. The lesson here? If an author mentions actual places, make certain the setting is accurately reflected. I learned this the hard way when I used two different names for the same minor character in separate books. It is essential for me, particularly when writing a series, to keep an updated list of important dates, character names and profiles, location and setting details. Nothing jars the reader more than meeting a character in book fifteen that was killed off in book three. Readers don’t like to be introduced to Ellen in the first chapter and discover she is Evelyn later in the story.   

  2. Maintain an emotional charge. A book that has lots of zing between the hero and heroine is a book that engages the reader. It sizzles with intensity. This is what I wanted to achieve in the Cady Delafield series. I envisaged the series as three books based on the standard romantic theme of: Boy meets girl; Boy loses girl; Boy wins girl back. As I began writing book three, I realized that Doyle and Cady, now planning their wedding, had to maintain that sizzle. In order to achieve this there had to be some obstacle which got in the way of their happiness. Happiness is what we all seek, but we like to see our characters work for it. I wanted readers perched on the edge of their seats, cheering for the couple to find that blissful place again.   

  3. Characters must evolve.  Life is ever changing. People struggle against obstacles, gain insight, grow, and hopefully achieve their heart’s desire. Often they realize what they most value and gain at the end of the story is not at all what they wanted in the beginning. As a reader, I like and expect to experience that change along with the character. When it isn’t there, when nothing has changed, I feel cheated. So in the Cady series, I made certain that she learns and becomes a better person because of her experiences.

Thanks for inviting me today.  It’s been a hoot!  Joyce

A Burning Truth 

Excerpt from A Burning Truth by Joyce Proell:

 

Doyle sat in the carriage, his brain frozen and his limbs unable to move. He watched Cady run up the steps and disappear into Ophelia’s impenetrable stone manor. When the front door boomed shut with the noise of a cannon blast, he jumped. He lurched forward and exploded out of the vehicle. She wasn’t getting rid of him so easily. In fact, she wasn’t getting rid of him at all. He had a voice in the matter. He intended to be heard.

Just as soon as he thought it, his steps faltered and he ground to a stop.
“Damn!”

Now was not the time to try to reason with her, not when she was in a cold fury. He pumped a fist against a thigh and stared at the mansion’s rock façade, aware her current state of mind was as solid and unshakable. Even if he managed to get beyond the front door, she wouldn’t listen. Not now.

His head fell back. A piercing ache tore through him, as if his heart and soul had been shredded and tossed aside. Gunmetal storm clouds reeled over the sky, bleak and threatening. The bite in the air made his cheeks sting. Inside he was hollowed and gutted. His fingers curled and uncurled. Muscles coiled, he pivoted with a fierce twist, snapped an order to Phelps then threw himself back into the carriage. His next move must be deployed with utmost care. The carriage jolted forward and thrust him back against the seat cushion. She needed time to cool. Then he’d be back, and she’d listen to what he had to say.